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Waste Site Allocations: Further Issues and Options (Preferred Options) Consultation

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View Comments (5) 7 The Waste Allocation Sites

7.1 Map Legend

Potential waste site
Waste site with existing planning permission(s)
Suggested buffering necessary for the site to be acceptable (above and beyond normal boundary screening/planting)
Area within site not considered suitable for allocation
Ramsar Site  (Wetland of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat)
SAC (Special Area of Conservation)
SPA (Special Protection Area)
NNR (National Nature Reserve)
SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest)
CWS (County Wildlife Sites)
Core River Valleys
Broads Authority Area
GSPZ 1 (Groundwater Source Protection Zone)
AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty)
Conservation Area
Historic Parks and Gardens
Scheduled Ancient Monuments
Environment Agency Flood Zone 2
Environment Agency Flood Zone 3
NNDR (Norwich Northern Distributor Road – Proposed)
Trunk Roads
Designated Lorry Roads (Based on Principal Routes, Main Distributor Routes and HGV Access Routes)
Public Right of Way
Internal Indicative Site Access Routes
External Indicative Site Access Routes
County Boundary

7.2 Inset Maps showing Site Locations

View Comments (2) 7.3 Breckland Waste Allocation Sites

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 14
ParishAshill
Location of siteAshill Recycling Centre, Swaffham Road, Ashill
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, HWRC, mixed waste processing, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification, and energy from waste.
Acceptable use/sComposting, inert waste recycling, extension of HWRC
Size of site (hectares)1.6
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 25,000; recycling 10,000
Background Information: The site is on the north side of the C768 Swaffham Road, approximately 1km west of Ashill. It comprises a former pit, now well vegetated, behind and to either side of the existing HWRC.
Landscape: No development of the site would be acceptable unless a substantial screen of trees and hedges on its boundaries were to be retained. Should this screening be removed, the impact on the character of the countryside to the north and west and on the views from the dwellings to the east would be unacceptable. Given the location, only uses such as composting or inert waste recycling, or an extension to the existing HWRC would be appropriate.
Ecology: Part of the western half of the site is a County Wildlife Site. Subject to surveys there are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed with an application.
Highways: Access to the site would be off the C768, which has no status within the route hierarchy. The B1108 west of Watton is 5.5km away to the south, necessitating use of unclassified roads. No use would be acceptable if it would result in intensification, and an increase in traffic.
External Consultee Comments:
Breckland District Council: The site would form an extension to a current household recycling centre and construction would be on brownfield land. The site is on the main road between Swaffham and Watton and could deal with waste generated from both of these towns. The road bypasses the village of Ashill but does go through the villages of Saham Toney and South Pickenham, and an increase of HGV traffic on this un-designated road could have a detrimental impact on these settlements. The site's allocation would provide a useful landbank for any waste/resources management infrastructure for Ashill, but is 5.5km sustainable? Effective screening could minimise any impact on views and landscape.
Parish/public concerns: Traffic through centre of Swaffham; would add to traffic problem in Ashill; effect on the ecology of the area.
Conclusion: the site is potentially acceptable for composting and inert waste recycling, and an extension to the existing HWRC, but could only be considered further in the context of additional information concerning the retention of existing trees and shrubs which screen the site, the safeguarding of the County Wildlife Site, and to detail of highway and traffic implications.

Site Reference No. View Comments (7) View Map WAS 47
ParishAttleborough
Location of siteWest Carr Road, Attleborough
Submitted byWoody’s Haulage
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)1.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.10,000
Background Information: The site contains buildings and open areas last used as a haulage depot (unused as at July 2009). The site is accessed off West Carr Road, west of the junction with the A11(T) Attleborough Bypass.
Landscape: The surrounding area is predominantly flat arable countryside west of Attleborough. There are dwellings close to the site along West Carr Road, the closest one being adjacent to it to the south. The site is largely screened from view by trees and bunding, and there would be very limited visual intrusion. Any extension of working hours would have an impact on local amenity, even though the proximity of the main road means that the area could not be described as tranquil.
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest.
Highways: The C137 West Carr Road has no specific designation with the route hierarchy. Its junction with the A11(T) is 100m to the east. Vehicles heading south on the A11 need first to travel north and then leave at the next junction and then re-enter the A11 heading south. A weight restriction prevents HGVs from taking a shorter but unsuitable route heading west.
External Consultee Comments:
Highways Agency: The A11 trunk road junction with West Carr Road affected by the site is a left in/left out junction. This site would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 100 HGVs and 20 cars. Require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A11.
Breckland District Council: The site is very close to A11 and therefore has good access to the town of Attleborough and other settlements along the trunk road. The site has the potential to deal with locally generated waste from Attleborough and surrounding settlements. With Attleborough's planned growth over the next 20 years, waste facility provision close to the town is essential. An excellent 'proximity principle' example, with a sufficient separation from major residential areas. The site is on brownfield land. The site is unlikely to have any impacts on the landscape due to current screening.
Parish/public concerns: No comments received.
Conclusion: Subject to assessment as required by the Highways Agency, the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 81 (also submitted as mineral site MIN111)
ParishAttleborough
Location of siteSwangey Fen
Submitted byEnnstone Johnston Limited
Proposed use/sInert landfill, secondary aggregate recycling
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)11.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is a valley floor meadow fringed with trees. Land rises to the north and south. There is a mineral working to the west, which has created a series of flooded gravel pits.
Landscape: No dwellings overlook the site. The only public viewpoint is from Swangey Lane which overlooks the site from the north, although the view of the valley floor meadow is partially screened by the trees on the northern site boundary. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction, and infilling with waste would be dependent on prior mineral extraction. Although the impact on individual viewpoints would be limited, the character of the valley floor meadow would be adversely affected by mineral extraction or any waste development associated with it. Bunding would be inappropriate to the valley landform. The site is not suitable in landscape terms.
Ecology: Swangey Fen SSSI abuts the site to the east and south. The site is not suitable in ecology terms.
Highways: The site is remote from the highway network, however the C823 Swangey Lane (HGV Access Route) lies some 350m to the north. The surrounding highways are narrow in width and suffer from poor alignment. Access would have to be provided via Swangey Lane only, and improvements would be required to that road.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, the site was included in the 2008 ‘Issues and Options’ consultation as proposed mineral extraction site MIN111, and the following responses received to the 2008 consultation are relevant to this site.
Environment Agency: - Adjacent to Norfolk Valley Fen SAC. In Flood Zone 3. Flood Risk Assessment would be required to appropriately investigate level of risk.
Natural England: - Potential adverse hydrological impacts on Swangey Fen SSSI, a composite site of the Norfolk Valley Fens SAC, both alone and in combination with other site allocations. Each allocation (MIN111, MIN102, MIN107, MIN108 & MIN110) would need to clearly demonstrate no adverse impacts on the European site.
Highways Agency: - Site is in a cluster around A11 between Norwich and Thetford. Site MIN 111 has the first point of contact with the A11 trunk road at the junction with Hargham Road and would generate an estimated 120 daily HGV movements.
Breckland District Council: - The site is in a Core River Valley. Object unless the scheme is excavated in a way that does not have a negative impact on the amenity of the Core River Valley. Development of the site may affect drainage of the SAC and therefore have a negative impact on protected species.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - Development could involve working into nationally-important glacial and interglacial deposits in Thet valley, particularly buried terrace remains of Ipswichian age. It would be useful to retain some open faces during working and restoration for scientific study.
Public/parish council comments: - The two main concerns raised were the proximity of the site to Swangey Fen SSSI (with consequent damage to wildlife) and that additional traffic would be accommodated on an unsuitable local road network.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape, ecology and highways reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (8) View Map WAS 21
Parish Beeston with Bittering
Location of sitePaynes Business Park, Dereham Road, Beeston
Submitted byEAS (Plant Hire) Ltd
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above.
Size of site (hectares)0.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site lies within a small industrial estate on the edge of Beeston village, west of Dereham Road and south of Dairy Drift. 
Landscape: The site is on industrial land containing large buildings, and the developments proposed would have a low additional impact in landscape terms. 
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological significance.
Highways: Access is likely to be off the C221 Dereham Road, an HGV Access Route. The road has poor alignment, and the exact point of access would need to be determined.
External Consultee Comments:
Highways Agency: Site would have significant impact on the A47 junction with Beeston Road, and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 2 car movements per day. The A47 trunk road junction with Beeston Road is an at-grade priority junction. The Agency require further assessment of the impact on the junction.
Breckland District Council: There would be no adverse effects on landscape character from this development. The land adjoins a HGV access route which leads south the A47 trunk road. The site is just south of Beeston behind a collection of industrial buildings on brownfield land. The uses proposed for the site may be better located closer to major sources of waste such as the market town to reduce journey time.
Parish/public concerns: Access for HGVs inadequate; distant from strategic road network; traffic would cause environmental harm and structural damage; danger from traffic on roads with no footpaths; impact on quiet village, houses close by; noise, smell, dust; detriment to local amenity and health; unsustainable location too far from an urban area; effect on wildlife; no need for a facility in this location; impact on tourism…
Conclusion: The site is on industrial land, allocated for employment use, and would be potentially acceptable for the uses proposed, subject to enclosure within a building, to local amenity considerations, and to highway considerations. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (29) View Map WAS 86 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 61)
Parish Beeston with Bittering
Location of sitePunch Farm
Submitted byEast Anglian Stone Limited
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)5.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site forms part of a wider area of largely open arable land although there are some small woods and boundary planting along the Litcham Road to the north. Previously permitted active quarries lie to the west and south-east, with accesses off Watery Lane and Mileham Road respectively. A restored area lies adjacent to the southern boundary.
Landscape: The site is also proposed as a mineral allocation, and infilling with waste would be dependent on prior mineral extraction. Provided that access constraints would not require the removal of screen vegetation along Litcham Road, this site could be used for the duration of extraction with relatively low landscape impact. An after-use with increased woodland cover could result in a landscape enhancement.
Ecology: Litcham Common SSSI, and County Wildlife sites 964, 965 and 2052 lie in the valley of the River Nar to the north. There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed in a planning application. 
Highways: Access is proposed from the north, off the C222 Litcham Road. Existing nearby quarries are accessed off the U35182 Watery Lane, which has no specific designation in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy. It is some 2km to the B1145 Litcham Road (Main Distributor) via Watery Lane, C222 Dereham Road and C123 Church Lane. These are all either Remaining Roads or Local Access Roads. An alternative but longer route is available via Watery Lane, C222 Litcham Road and C221 Mileham Road. This route is approx 5km. This site is poorly located in relation to suitable routes in the Strategic Highway Network. Local routes to a Main Distributor Road or Principal Road may require improvements to make them acceptable. There is a current application C/3/2009/3008 for a new quarry access to Litcham Road to replace that to Watery Lane. All traffic is proposed to be routed along the C222 Litcham Road and C229 Honeypot Lane to the A47. The application has yet to be determined, and a conclusion on site WAS86 as to the highway implications should await a decision on the application.
External Consultee Comments: This proposed inert waste recycling operation was consulted on during the ‘Issues and Options’ consultation in 2008, as part of proposals for MIN 61. Therefore, the following responses received regarding MIN 61, during the 2008 consultation, are relevant to this site.
Highways Agency: - Several of the sites put forward are clustered around the A47 near to East Dereham. Although none of the sites require direct access to the trunk road network, there are two locations on the A47 where the majority of minerals traffic would seek access to the trunk road via at-grade junctions: at Wendling and Beeston Road. These junctions currently appear to operate within capacity and have recently been subject to safety-related improvements. Sites MIN23, MIN61, MIN68 and MIN100 could materially increase the number of HGVs through the Beeston Road at-grade priority junction which may be considered undesirable on this section of single-carriageway trunk road. It is recommended that the impact of each of these sites should be assessed prior to possible identification as a preferred location, and also if more than one of the sites is proposed simultaneously.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - Although not a site of national significance, it would be useful to retain some open faces for scientific study during the operational stages, and ideally after restoration, and have a ‘watching brief’ during the extraction phase in case features of potential geodiversity interest are revealed.
Breckland District Council: - The site is reasonably close to the towns of Dereham and Swaffham, and therefore would be a source of materials for the planned development of these towns. The seclusion of the site, within a more contained part of the Plateau should not have a significant impact on landscape or views.
Public/parish council concerns: - The main concerns raised were unacceptable noise and dust production, already excessive levels of traffic and HGVs on local roads, and the serious impacts on local landscape and ecology.
Conclusion: the site is potentially acceptable for inert waste recycling, subject to resolution of the highway access issue, and to prior mineral extraction being acceptable.

Site Reference No. View Comments (407) View Map WAS 1
Parish Beetley
Location of site Beck Farm, East Bilney, East Dereham
Submitted by Mr R Richmond
Proposed use/s Composting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, landfill (non-hazardous and/or inert), household waste recycling centre, waste transfer, pyrolysis and gasification
Acceptable use/s Inert waste recycling, inert fill, composting
Size of site (hectares) 13.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a. Compost 40,000; recycling 50,000; inert fill 40,000
Background Information: In an active mineral working. Inert waste recycling is also permitted.
Landscape: Not suitable for a permanent waste facility. There could however be scope on the land for an ongoing temporary permission for recycling as mineral working progresses. There may also be scope, in landscape terms, for a small scale operation such as composting, which requires a rural location, subject to its design.
Ecology: Need to demonstrate no significant impact on the River Wensum SAC, or County Wildlife Site 2137 Beck Farm Meadows to the north. 
Highways: Access should be as for the existing quarry, off Rawhall Lane, and then via the B1146.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concerned at impact of run-off on CWS in valley.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is above a major aquifer. They would not object to inert landfill.
Breckland District Council: The site is currently a mineral working. Development of waste facilities would further delay restoration of the site. Some of the uses for the site, which have larger footprints, such as thermal treatment facilities may cause detriment to the surrounding rural landscape character. HWRC would be better located close to Dereham to reduce car journeys.
Parish/public concerns: Close to East Bilney village, landscape intrusion, industrialisation, noise, dust, roads inadequate, danger from traffic, water pollution, ecological impact, impact on tourism.
Conclusion: Permanent development on the site would not be consistent with approved restoration; it would also extend the life of the site, and conflict with landscape policies. Temporary uses (i.e. inert waste recycling, inert fill, composting) at a low level within the quarry would be appropriate where they would not prejudice progress of restoration or its completion date. Existing quarry access to Rawhall Lane to be used. The site should be considered as a preferred site for inert waste recycling, inert fill, or composting.

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Comments (408) View Map WAS 83 - SITE WITHDRAWN
Parish Beetley
Location of siteBeetley landfill site, Folly Lane
Submitted byNorfolk County Council
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment / energy from waste, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer, pyrolysis/gasification
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)13.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site comprises the former Beetley landfill site, now largely restored. A landfill gas to electricity plant is located in the north-eastern part of the site. 
Landscape: The surroundings comprise a wider area of open arable landscape punctuated with hedgerow oaks and small areas of woodland. The valley of the Blackwater stream falls away to the north, towards East Bilney village. Residential properties on Church Lane in the village are within 400m. Folly Lane, part of the route of National Cycle Network Route1, passes along the eastern edge of the former landfill site, and has views over the area. There are limited views from the B1146, School Road and Folly Lane and also from Fludges Lane to the north, near the church. The previous landfill and HWRC activities have ceased, and further uses of this site in the countryside would not be acceptable in landscape terms, being likely to affect adversely the amenities of residents at East Bilney, and users of Folly Lane.
Ecology: The site would need to be surveyed for protected species. There is a need to demonstrate no significant impact on County Wildlife Site 2137 Beck Farm Meadows to the north. There would be potential for creation of BAP habitat and to encourage BAP and protected species as part of restoration.
Highways: The former landfill site is accessed from the C702 Folly Lane, which is a narrow lane having no specific designation in the route hierarchy. A new access onto the B1146 is unlikely to be acceptable to the Highway Authority. If the site were to be accessed off Folly Lane it would be approx 400m to the B1146 (via C224 School Road or C702 Halfpenny Lane). The junction with the B1146 would require improvement.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site for any of the developments proposed, on highways, landscape and amenity grounds. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (407) View Map WAS 87 (also submitted as mineral site MIN51)
Parish Beetley
Location of siteLand West of Bilney Road
Submitted byEast Anglian Stone Limited
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)14.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site comprises open agricultural land, with boundary hedges and hedgerow trees. A block of woodland and rough grass lie within the centre of the site. 
Landscape: The site lies within a wider area of open arable landscape punctuated with hedgerow oaks and small areas of woodland. It can be seen from Bilney Lane to the east, with a longer view from Stoney Lane to the south and Rawhall Lane to the north. It is remote from property and fairly flat, and would be relatively easy to screen from views from the surrounding roads. The site contains some good internal landscape features, rare in this open landscape, and which would need to be protected through a suitable working plan. Access requirements may lead to improvements on the adjacent network of country lanes which could themselves have an adverse landscape impact. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction, and inert waste recycling would be dependent on prior extraction. As a minerals site there would be constraints in relation to phasing and the retention of internal landscape features and details of method of working and access. These could be overcome with a suitable method of working. Should mineral extraction occur at the site, inert waste recycling could be carried out for the duration of extraction with relatively low landscape impact.
Ecology: BAP species and habitats likely to be affected (by minerals development) are water vole, barbastelle bat, pipistrelle bat, brown hare, skylark, corn bunting, tree sparrow, grey partridge, bullfinch, turtle dove, song thrush, red-tipped cudweed, shepherd's needle, small-flowered catchfly, spreading hedge parsley. Recycling as proposed would raise no additional ecological issues which could not be addressed with an application.
Highways: The site is adjacent to the C225 Bilney Lane, which has no specific designation within the County Council’s route hierarchy. Use of the site for recycling would be dependent on achieving an acceptable access for mineral extraction, which may require use of ground conveyors and then utilising the existing access to East Bilney Quarry from Rawhall Lane. That quarry is however in separate ownership, and no link has been suggested between the two sites. A conveyor could not be used in connection with waste recycling, and acceptable access arrangements would need to be made between the site and the B1146. There are likely to be cumulative highway impacts arising from development of surrounding sites, in particular upon traffic flows through Dereham. 
External Consultee Comments: This proposed inert waste recycling operation was consulted on during the ‘Issues and Options’ consultation in 2008, as part of proposals for MIN 51. Therefore, the following responses received regarding MIN 51, during the 2008 consultation, are relevant to this site.
Highways Agency: - The site is in a cluster around the A47 near to East Dereham. Site MIN 51 has the first point of contact with the A47 Trunk road at the junction with the B1135 and an estimated 120 daily HGV movements. Using the most direct route, mineral extraction is likely to have the most significant daily traffic cumulative impact (worst-case) at this junction which is affected by sites MIN28, MIN 63, MIN 8, MIN 9, MIN 10, MIN 11, MIN 12, MIN 13, MIN 89, MIN 15, MIN 51, and MIN 72. These sites would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 2680 HGVs and one to two personal injury accidents per year over a 5 year period.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - Although not a site of national significance, it would be useful to retain some open faces for scientific study during the operational stages, and ideally after restoration.
Public/parish council comments: - The main concerns raised were unacceptable impacts on the local landscape, ecological damage, extra noise and dust, and particularly the negative impacts of further HGV movements. In addition, some complained that Beetley and East Bilney have suffered already for many years from mineral extraction and should be given a “rest? from further activities.
Conclusion:ethe site is potentially acceptable for inert waste recycling, subject to satisfactory access arrangements, and to prior mineral extraction being acceptable.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 6
Parish Carbrooke
Location of siteLand Off B1108 Norwich Road, Carbrooke
Submitted by4 Leaf Enterprises Ltd
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, reworking, removal and re-use of deposited foundry sand.
Acceptable use/sInert waste recycling, reworking, removal and re-use of deposited foundry sand.
Size of site (hectares)0.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.20,000
Background Information: The site is a small, partly infilled former quarry with vegetated sloping sides. It lies 3km east of Watton.
Landscape: Screen planting and maintenance of existing planting should be undertaken to mitigate any views into the site, including from Southmoor Farm. Existing trees growing on the site boundaries and on the sloping sides of the quarry would need to be retained, including during consideration of highway access. Impact on amenities of local residents would need to be considered, particularly in the case of any inert waste recycling activity.
Ecology: There are no natural environment designations on the site. A County Wildlife Site (2091 Watton Airfield) lies 300m to the south-west.
Highways: Access to the site would be via an existing access off the U33104 minor road, a short distance south of its junction with the B1108, a Main Distributor Route. There is limited visibility for traffic emerging onto the B1108. This would need to be addressed.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency acknowledge that there is merit in the extraction, recycling and re-use of material deposited at this site, subject to analysis to ensure it is suitably processed.
Breckland District Council: The site is in close proximity of Watton and Carbrooke and could deal with the increased level of waste from construction projects delivering the new development planned in Breckland's preferred options on its core strategy. The end product from recycling could be used in construction projects locally. The site is on brownfield land and can be directly accessed from the B1108.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is part of the claylands plateau land form of central Norfolk, and is likely to impact on extensive category resources including Cretaceous Chalk and Pleistocene glacial sediments of the Lowestoft Formation. These geological resources are under-researched in this part of central Norfolk, and the proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. Likely to lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at district or local levels.
Parish/public comments: No comments.
Conclusion: The site should be considered as a preferred site for the categories of development put forward.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 34
Parish Cranworth
Location of siteShipdham Transfer Station, Shipdham Industrial Estate, Dereham
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group
Proposed use/sHousehold waste recycling centre
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)0.6
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.4,000
Background Information: The site is an existing waste transfer facility within an industrial estate, which has developed on part of the former Shipdham Airfield. The site contains a building permitted as a waste transfer station in 1993.
Landscape: The wider surroundings are rural, comprising arable farmland . The site is within an industrial estate with large buildings and cranes, which have a significant landscape impact. Subject to the scale of any new buildings not being such as to add to this impact, the proposal would be acceptable in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site is not close to any designated natural habitat, and there are no outstanding ecological issues. 
Highways: Highway access is off the C197 Mile Road, which is designated as a HGV Access Route. There is a scheme to improve the HGV access route in the long term programme. The site could potentially be a preferred option in transport terms, with additional information or modification. Contributions may be needed towards improvements and localised widening to the carriageway.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: An environmental permit will be required.
Breckland District Council: The site is located on Shipdham Airfield which is allocated for employment uses in the 1999 Breckland Local Plan and is proposed as a General Employment Area in the emerging Breckland Core Strategy and Development Control policies DPD. The site is relatively close to Shipdham and Dereham, both of which will see development over the plan period. The site is on brownfield land and is on a designated HGV access route. Dereham does not currently have a household recycling centre and therefore one located in Shipdham Airfield would be beneficial to the town.
Parish/public concerns: Concern over litter, fly-tipping, noise, smell, dust, and water pollution. Reymerston already suffers with HGVs, and has no footpaths. The village is used regularly by horse riders, cyclists and dog walkers. The C197 to the waste centre is unsuitable for any more traffic. Likely increase of wildlife deaths on the roads. Existing HWRCs are concentrated to the south, north and Norwich, and the choice of site needs to be further north and/or west. Rare species of flora and fauna and their habitats need to be protected. Boreholes are likely to be contaminated including the large one at Shipdham. Designated lorry route must be adhered to. The Letton Road turning into the road to Dereham would become more dangerous. To further develop Shipdham airfield industrial site a proper road is needed to allow access.
Conclusion: The site is potentially suitable as a preferred site for a HWRC.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 63
Parish Croxton
Location of siteLand to north-west of Watton Road, Kilverstone, Thetford
Submitted byPearsons (Thetford) Limited
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)25.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is an agricultural field in an area of gently rolling farmland with large blocks of plantation woodland. The village of Croxton lies 1.5km to the west. The site is adjacent to the Norwich to Ely railway line, and to the west of the A1075 Thetford to Watton road.
Landscape: The site is screened by woodland except on the south-eastern side, alongside the railway line and facing the A1075. Impacts on amenity would be limited to users of the road and railway. Subject to the scale of development, and to additional screening, the site could be accepted in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site adjoins Breckland Forest SSSI and a County Wildlife Site (CWS 716 Kilverstone Meadow). Possible impacts include drainage of some CWS, airborne nutrient deposition, and disturbance impacts on nearby SAC/SPA sites. A number of protected and Biodiversity Action Plan species and related habitats are likely to be affected.
Highways: The nearest public highway is the A1075 Thetford Road (principal route), access to which lies some 500m to the north-east, close to a railway crossing. This is not considered suitable for the volume of traffic likely to be generated. The site does not have safe or adequate access, and is unsuitable in transport terms.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England: Note potential adverse impacts on a number of component SSSIs which make up the Breckland SAC, including Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths due to aerial deposition from thermal treatment and pyrolysis, both alone and in combination with other site allocations.
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concern over potential adverse impacts on SSSI and SAC heaths of airborne nutrients from thermal treatment and pyrolysis.
Environment Agency: Object; note that the site is above a major aquifer. Development would only be acceptable if there is a natural low permeability geological barrier.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency require detailed assessment in relation to traffic impact on the A11(T), which has a roundabout junction with the A1075 1.8km to the south-west.
Breckland District Council: Development could have a detrimental impact on these protected habitats. Object unless appropriate access to the site can be achieved alongside necessary screening to conserve the character of the landscape. The site is 4km from the outskirts of Thetford, but the access is on the main road between Thetford and Watton (A1075) is adjacent to a level crossing and not suitable for the increased level of traffic likely to be generated by this development.
Parish/public concerns: Due to the proximity of this proposed site to a Breckland SPA and Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SAC, there could be disastrous effects on protected species and their habitats plus Biodiversity Action Plan species. HGV traffic would run along the A1075 from an already congested/dangerous roundabout serving the A1075 and A11 Thetford bypass, over a rail crossing that has already been subject to a number of accidents. The village of Croxton is already subjected to traffic noise from the A11 and Snetterton race track. With prevailing wind direction, any emissions/pollution would adversely affect the villages of Croxton and Wretham. The large amount of industrial traffic would affect on the surrounding area. Thermal treatment in particular would require large buildings and chimneys. The site is open to view, and the railway from Thetford to Norwich lies alongside the site, meaning that all visitors to the area will be welcomed by the vision of a waste processing site. Concern over dust; there would be pollution from noise, rubbish, air, and light; detrimental impacts on rights of way; recreation and tourism; the A1075 is too busy and has an above average number of casualties.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for highways and ecological reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 75
Parish Hockering
Location of siteFrans Green Industrial Estate, Sandy Lane
Submitted byMonk Plant Hire
Proposed use/sWaste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)0.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site lies on an industrial site at Frans Green, in the parish of Hockering. 
Landscape: The industrial area is set within a wider area of mainly arable plateau farmland. It detracts from the general appearance of the countryside, but the impact of this proposal is likely to be low given the industrial context of the surroundings.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest.
Highways: The industrial estate is accessed via the U35074 Sandy Lane, which has no specific designation in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. However, it is less than 100m to the C451 Sandy Lane/Walnut Tree Lane, which is an HGV Access Route in the Route Hierarchy. The County Council is currently investigating route options for an improved route between the A47 / A1067 in this area. A contribution towards this scheme will be required.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site. It is very small, and its use would more appropriately be assessed in the context of detailed local considerations, through a planning application. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 4
Parish Kilverstone
Location of siteLand north of Brettenham Road
Submitted byPearsons (Thetford) Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)15.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: There is no minerals or waste planning history on the site. Landfill was permitted in 1991 on land to the south; the site has been completed and restored.
Landscape: The visual impact would be very limited as the site is so well screened. Any use of the site would depend on the existing tree belts being retained to provide screening, so any use of the site for waste would have to be carried out in a way which did not damage them. There would be an impact on the quality of what is at present a distinctive and attractive landscape (albeit one which cannot be easily seen). There might also be an issue of impact on Brettenham Heath, although this would be more likely to be one of noise or light than direct visual impact.
Ecology: Breckland SPA, Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SAC, and numerous CWS are in the vicinity. Potential impacts would be on drainage of some CWS, but more importantly, nutrient deposition (airborne) and disturbance impacts on nearby SAC/SPA sites. Any species would need appropriate assessment.
Highways: The private access to the site is long and has restricted visibility at its junction with the C148. The C148 itself suffers from poor alignment and visibility, and is not suitable for additional commercial traffic.
Archaeology: Potential applicants will be required to submit the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation with any planning application. Applicants should contact Norfolk Landscape Archaeology for a brief for such evaluation.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England: Potential adverse impacts on a number of component SSSIs which make up the Breckland SAC, including Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SSSI, due to aerial deposition from thermal treatment and pyrolysis, both alone and in combination with other site allocations. Each allocation would need to clearly demonstrate no adverse impacts on the European site.
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concern over potential adverse impacts on SSSI and SAC heaths of airborne nutrients from thermal treatment and pyrolysis.
Environment Agency: Do not hold any information as to whether the landfill is currently gassing. If this is the case then there could be conflicts of interest between the two land uses. This would be if the landfill required leachate or gas management systems which would not be able to be maintained as a result of the new proposal. (Note: site proposer would use methane from adjoining closed landfill for power generation). Due to the underlying geology the proposed scheme would require the site to be covered with a sealed impermeable surface to prevent the leachate from waste entering the underlying source protection zone being (major aquifer for public water supply). In addition the site would require the installation of appropriate sealed foul and surface water drainage systems.
Highways Agency: Would require detailed assessment in relation to impact on the junction of the A1075 with the A1075.
National Grid PLC: The site is crossed by a National Grid high pressure gas transmission pipeline. 
Breckland District Council: The site is very remote and cannot be easily viewed, so any impact on the visual amenity of the landscape will be minimal if the site were to be developed. Development of the site would have to ensure that the tree belts are retained as these are an important feature of the surrounding landscape character and work as effective screening from surrounding view points. The planned growth of Thetford will mean a large increase in the waste that the town produces, therefore there is a need for a local facility to treat and manage this waste. This site is only 3.5 kilometres from the outskirts of the town. The proposed use for this site would be considered as ‘bad neighbour’ uses and would be best located away from residential areas.
Parish/public concerns: The A1075 is a narrow road which will become more congested as the surrounding town’s population increase. Effect on a tranquil area of noise and dust pollution from lorries and machinery. The nearest property to the site would have their garden on the edge of the site. The proposed landfill would have a significant detrimental effect to the local tourist economy. The nearby campsite attracts over 55000 visitors annually, and many walkers, horse riders and cyclists would be put off visiting the area. 
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape, amenity, ecological and highways grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (31) View Map WAS 9
Parish Longham
Location of siteLongham Hall, Longham, Dereham
Submitted byMr N McLeod
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sTemporary composting and inert waste recycling.
Size of site (hectares)17.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 20,000, recycling 50,000
Background Information: The site is part of a large active sand and gravel working known as Longham Quarry, which also has permission for some inert waste recycling and infill. These activities are subject to temporary permissions, requiring cessation of mineral extraction by the end of December 2010, infill and recycling by the end of December2011, and completion of restoration by the end of 2012. Bittering Quarry and its processing and asphalt plant lie to the east. Bittering and Longham Quarries are operated as one, by Tarmac Ltd.
Landscape: The quarries lie within a wider area of open arable countryside. Manor Cottage lies approximately 500m north of this site, is visually well contained, and does not have a direct view into the site. In landscape terms the main issue could be noise, which could affect the quiet enjoyment of the countryside of the users of the Nar Valley Way which follows Bittering Lane to the east. Given that the existing uses are temporary (pending restoration of the mineral working), and the countryside location, only less intensive uses such as composting and inert waste recycling on parts of the site would be acceptable.
Ecology: The site itself is of no special ecological interest. Protected species and habitats in the vicinity would need to be safeguarded.
Highways: The precise access point has not been identified, but it would be off the west side of the C229 Reed Lane, an HGVAccess Route leading south to the A47. The existing Longham Quarry access off Reed Lane is to the north of this site. Any new access would require appropriate visibility splays. 
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: The proximity of this proposed waste site allocation to the scheduled Devil's Dyke may have a detrimental impact on the setting of this feature, particularly with the provision of new structures for waste management facilities.
Highways Agency: The site would have a significant impact on the A47 trunk road (at-grade priority junction) at Wendling, and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day. Sites WAS9 and WAS10 would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 100 HGVs and 1220 cars. The Agency require detailed assessment of impact on the junction.
Breckland District Council: The site is currently operated as a mineral extraction site. Development of the site would prevent the implementation of the proposed restoration scheme and result in further development in remote countryside.
Parish/public concerns: The Parish Council state that the proposed uses would add to problems of non-sustainability and the need to reduce carbon emissions and other pollutants as demand for the proposed uses is far from the proposed site to cause needlessly long heavy lorry journeys. The development would be inconsistent with policy as established in 2002 when planning permission for composting on the site was refused. Development would be inconsistent with the Breckland Development Framework to enhance landscape features. There would be significant increased heavy lorry traffic on Litcham Road and Salters Lane. Other respondents object on following grounds: the current mineral extraction is temporary pending restoration; visual impact; wrong place for industrial development, leading to greater CO2 emissions; green waste recycling should be local to source; ecological impact; effect of bio-aerosols, noise and dust on health; composting site nearby was refused; damage, danger, and amenity impact of more HGVs; inadequate roads; impact on cultural heritage including listed buildings; groundwater pollution; too close to houses; detriment to leisure and tourism activities; cumulative effect of sites in the area, and need for sites questioned.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site within which to locate temporary composting and inert recycling only where that would not be prejudicial to restoration of the site. Given the large size of the site, the whole of it would not be appropriate for waste development, and identification and assessment of appropriate locations within the site would be required.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 10
Parish Longham
Location of siteLongham Hall, Longham, Dereham
Submitted byMr N McLeod
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)8.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site lies to the west of Honeypot Lane, adjacent to the former Wendling Airfield, in an open, level landscape. Poultry sheds are sited on parts of the disused runway, to the south. 
Landscape: The site lies within a relatively tranquil area of countryside as defined by the CPRE map and an area of dark countryside as shown on the county map. The existing recycling operation is intrusive within this area of open arable countryside, and a more intensive and permanent facility would continue to impact adversely on the landscape.
Ecology: The site is of no special ecological interest.
Highways: The site is located on the C229 Honeypot Lane which is an HGV Access Route in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy. The existing access suffers from restricted visibility. The applicant needs to demonstrate how safe access will be achieved. The adjacent public highways suffer from poor alignment at this point. The exact point of access needs to be determined.
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: Have concerns regarding the visual impact of the proposed waste site allocation on the setting of the scheduled moat to the north, would require further assessment, and details to be provided.
Highways Agency: The site would have a significant impact on the A47 trunk road (at-grade priority junction) at Wendling, and have an estimated 1200 car movements per day (due to the HWRC proposal). Sites WAS10 and WAS9 would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 100 HGVs and 1220 cars. The Agency require detailed assessment of impact on the junction.
Breckland District Council: The site is on Greenfield land in open countryside. Development on the site is likely to be intrusive on the surrounding open arable countryside. 
Parish/public concerns: Unsuitable roads (C229 unsuitable for more HGVs); traffic impact; loss of hedges; amenity impact; impact on tranquil rural character; visual impact, including on church; effect on flora and fauna; danger, damage and amenity impact of traffic; dust, noise and odour; light and other pollution; health issues; wrong location for HWRC; cumulative impact with other sites; impact on leisure and tourism.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape and amenity grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 11
Parish Longham
Location of siteLongham Hall, Longham, Dereham
Submitted byMr N McLeod
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)0.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: This site lies to the west of Longham Hall and its ancillary buildings. It is part of the farm complex, within an open agricultural arable landscape, and is screened from external views. Access is via a farm track running north to the C222 Litcham Road. The C229 Reed Lane passes to the east of the Hall.
Landscape: The site lies within an area of relative tranquillity as defined by the CPRE and lies within a dark landscape on the county map. The site is remote from property apart from the Hall and is screened from the Litcham Road by an area of dense scrub. Whilst the site is in the countryside, it could be used for inert recycling with a relatively low landscape impact provided the pond is retained and an adequate screen provided to the south. 
Ecology: The site is of no special ecological interest.
Highways: Access would be acceptable only if arranged to the east, off the C229 Reed Lane, which is an HGVAccess Route running south to the A47 from the Bittering and Longham Quarries further north. 
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: Have significant concerns regarding the impact of this proposed waste site allocation on the setting of the Grade II St Andrew’s Church and Grade II Longham Hall. The existing access is poor, and the provision of a new or upgraded access, combined with an increased intensification of traffic, would likely detract from the setting of the said listed buildings.
Breckland District Council: The site is located at the back of Longham Hall and is currently used for trailer storage. The existing buildings on the site along with the trailers detract from the rural appearance of the site and any new development is not likely to further affect the character of the surrounding landscape. The site is fairly remote from larger settlements which will see further growth during the plan period. Access would need to be achieved via the C229 road and it is unsure whether the applicant has the landholding to make this possible. Do not object, providing access can be achieved on to the HGV route C229.
Parish/public concerns: Landscape and visual impact; effect on rural peace and tranquillity of an industrial operation; noise and dust from site and vehicles; health impacts; impact of HGVs on roads and hedges, and on highway safety; the C229 is not suitable for more traffic; site has no suitable access; detriment to wildlife; pollution of groundwater; cumulative effect with other operations; impact on leisure and tourism, and wrong location for such development in terms of accessibility.
Conclusion: This small site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on amenity grounds. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 84
Parish North Pickenham
Location of siteThe Old Airfield, North Pickenham
Submitted byEcowise UK Limited
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer, pyrolysis/gasification
Acceptable use/sComposting
Size of site (hectares)4.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.25,000
Background Information: The site is allocated for Employment uses in the Breckland District Local Plan. It lies on a former airfield, now used as an industrial area, including poultry houses on the old runways. 
Landscape: There is vegetation along the eastern boundary of the site and it abuts an industrial area to the south. The site is set within an area of plateau farmland on the edge of an attractive area of more rolling countryside in the valley of the River Wissey. It is relatively remote from village settlement lying approximately 0.5 km west of North Pickenham. Peddars Way long distance path lies approximately 800m to the north and east. The landscape impact of development would depend on the ultimate configuration of the site and the height of any structures. The site lies within an area of relative tranquillity as defined by the CPRE. In overall terms it is considered that a well designed proposal would have a relatively low impact on the wider landscape provided highway requirements could be met without significant local road widening. An HWRC would be less appropriate due to the fact it is isolated from large areas of settlement and consequent traffic generation, to the detriment of the rural tranquillity of the area. 
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest.
Highways: The site is located on the U33268 Airfield Lane, which has no specific designation in Norfolk County Council’s route hierarchy. The site would need to be accessed from the C768 (former B1108) Watton Road, Main Distributor Route via the U33268 Airfield Lane. It is approximately 6km from the site to the Watton Road. Highway improvements would be needed, including passing bays, widening of the bell- mouth at the junction of the C768 and U33268, of the site entrance. The proposal would not be acceptable if extant permissions on the site remained as there would be a potential for significant traffic which would not be catered for by the improvements suggested.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: the site is potentially acceptable for a use which would have a low impact on the landscape, such as composting, and which could be accommodated without significant and intrusive road improvements.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 20
Parish North Tuddenham
Location of siteNorwich Road, Tuddenham
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Limited
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, waste transfer, HWRC, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification, energy from waste
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)12.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is in a rural landscape and comprises arable farmland and a block of deciduous woodland between Norwich Road (C489) to the north and the A47(T) dual carriageway to the south. The site is approximately 1km west of the village of East Tuddenham.
Landscape: The site is open to views from the A47 to the south and much of it is visible from Norwich Road. Notwithstanding the presence of the A47, the site and surrounding area has a strong rural character, where new development of an industrial type would be unacceptable in the context of Core Strategy Landscape and Design Policies. None of the categories of waste management development proposed would be acceptable on this site.
Ecology: The area of mixed deciduous woodland (North Tuddenham Plantation) provides habitat for protected species. Its loss would be unacceptable.
Highways: Access would be gained off the C489 north of the site, close to its junction with the B1147, a main Distributor Route. Subject to visibility splays the developments proposed could be accommodated in highway terms.
External Consultee Comments:
Highways Agency: A broad overview as to the potential, worst-case cumulative daily traffic impacts at those trunk road junctions identified (if all waste sites were to go ahead), is as follows, and sets out the maximum daily traffic which would occur under this situation. The A47 trunk road junction with the B1110 - affected by site WAS20 is a partial grade separated junction. This site would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 100 HGVs and 20 cars and less than one personal injury accidents per year over a 5 year period.
Breckland District Council: The development could result in loss of woodland, which is an important characteristic of the surrounding landscape character type and could be of local biodiversity importance. Industrial type of development in this area will detract from the rural nature of the landscape. The site is located in open countryside on Greenfield land. The site is close to Dereham and there will be a need for waste management facilities close to the town. Object. A facility like this would be better located on surrounding industrial area, such as Shipdham Airfield.
Parish/public concerns: Numerous objections, on grounds of visual impact of industrial development in the countryside; danger from traffic on minor roads; noise, smell, dust, light pollution, vermin, water pollution; hazard to agriculture, fly-tipping; impact on landscape and wildlife; loss of woodland; it should be on industrial land.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site for any of the developments proposed, on landscape grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (16) View Map WAS 53 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 35)
Parish Quidenham
Location of siteSawmill Field, Heath Road, Quidenham
Submitted byFrimstone Limited
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, landfill of inert waste
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)5.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is a field to the south-west of the Snetterton industrial area, off Heath Road. The site adjoins a closed landfill with an active HWRC to the north-west. Industrial development lies further north-west. Snetterton motor racing circuit lies 500m to the west, and a railway and residential development are at Eccles Road 400m to the north-east. A group of residential properties at the railway crossing lies approximately 150m to the south-east. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a minerals allocation; site MIN 35.
Landscape: The existing industrial estates are detrimental to the local landscape. Sounds from the motor racing circuit can be heard at the site. This could not be considered a tranquil, unspoilt area of countryside, but waste development would increase impact on local amenity. The site is not considered in landscape terms to be acceptable for the developments proposed. Potential cumulative impact should also be considered in the context of submission WAS19. 
Ecology: The site is not of any particular ecological significance, but its wider surroundings include County Wildlife Sites 620, 621, 622, and 623. 
Highways: The site is off the U33105 Heath Road, which has no specific designation within the County Council’s route hierarchy. The access proposed is however within 50m of the C827 Heath Road, which is designated as an HGV route. Use of this access would be acceptable to the County Highway Authority for the uses proposed, subject to appropriate visibility splays. 
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is likely to impact on Pleistocene glacial till and outwash deposits of the Anglian Lowestoft Formation, as researched at the adjacent Snetterton Heath Pit. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is above a major aquifer. The site would need to be covered with a sealed impermeable surface to prevent leachate entering the aquifer. Landfill of inert waste would necessitate the installation of a natural geological protection barrier against the escape/through-flow of polluting leachate into sensitive or protected groundwater supplies.
Highways Agency: Raise no objection in principle. The site would have a significant impact on the A11 junction with Heath Road, and have an estimated 100 HGV and 20 car movements per day.
Breckland District Council: Development of this site would be dependent on it first being allocated for mineral extraction. Inert recycling of material could provide material for development in Snetterton and the surrounding areas on the A11 corridor. Inert recycling and inert landfill could provide disposal methods for construction material waste from development in the locality. Landfill in this location would only occur to restore the site which could eventually promote biodiversity.
Parish/public concerns: The sawmill field and the top half of the Wood Yard site is left 'wild' and supports a huge diversity of wildlife. The dust, noise and pollution (e.g. from increased traffic) would have a detrimental effect on the lives of the local community. Prevailing winds from this site, and the rest of Snetterton Heath blow in the direction of Eccles and Wilby. There are four dwellings near the bottom of the site, which do not seem to have been taken into account. Concern about the proximity of the site to Eccles and other residential properties. The residents of Heath Road will be 50-150 yards from the landfill site. There is unused land near the A11 junction. The U33105 is a narrow/pot-holed no-through road with a main railway-line at the bottom & a dangerous/busy junction at the top. Concern that an increase in levels of traffic would make access difficult for emergency services.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape and amenity grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) WAS 80 (also submitted as mineral site MIN107)
Parish Shropham
Location of siteSpong Lane North
Submitted byEnnstone Johnston Limited
Proposed use/sInert landfill, secondary aggregate recycling
Acceptable use/sinert fill only
Size of site (hectares)11.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site consists of three arable fields in an area of predominantly rolling arable farmland. The village of Shropham is to the south and south-east. 
Landscape: The land rises from the west to a plateau in the middle of the site, then grades downwards towards the River Thet to the north and east. The valley is well wooded, and there are also blocks of woodland, most significantly to the north-west of the site at Longmeadow Plantation. Most of the site falls away from main viewpoints. The main visual impact is likely to be on residents of Meadow Cottages, near the south-western corner of the site. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction, and infilling with waste would be dependent on prior extraction. Excavation would need to be kept away from the western field within the site. Otherwise, the visual and amenity impacts would be limited, except from the potential prolongation of operations by the import of inert waste. Waste recycling would not be acceptable.
Ecology: A County Wildlife Site (CWS814 South of Mount Pleasant) lies 300m to the north. CWS809 Shropham Fen, and CWS645 Old Gravel Works lie 300m to east and south-east. Restoration including cereal field margins, lowland mixed deciduous woodland and mixed native hedgerow would be beneficial.
Highways: The site is remote from the highway network. The surrounding highways are narrow in width and suffer from poor alignment. Access might be possible, via a private track (currently a minerals and waste haul road), to the C823 Swangey Lane 1.1Km to the east, and which is designated as an HGV route. This would be the only acceptable access, and improvements would be required to Swangey Lane.
Archaeology: Some archaeological work would be needed. 
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, the site was included in the 2008 ‘Issues and Options’ consultation as proposed mineral extraction site MIN 107, and the following responses received to the 2008 consultation are relevant to this site.
Environment Agency: - The site lies over a major aquifer and is in Source Protection Zone 3
Highways Agency: - Several of the sites put forward are clustered around the A11 between Norwich and Thetford. Although none of the sites require direct access to the trunk road network, the following A11 junctions are where mineral extraction is likely to have the most significant impact - assuming that the most direct route (in accordance with NCC road hierarchy plan) is taken to/from the trunk road. Site MIN 107 has the first point of contact with the A11 trunk road at the junction with Hargham Road and an estimated 120 daily HGV movements. Cumulatively, sites MIN111, MIN107, MIN108, MIN 110 and MIN102 may have an impact on the A11/Hargham Road grade-separated junction. Although this junction does not currently have a poor safety record or capacity issue of note, cumulatively the impact of the above sites may be detrimental in terms of safety and/or capacity. It is recommended that assessment should be carried out if more than one of the sites is proposed simultaneously.
Natural England: - Potential adverse hydrological impacts on Swangey Fen SSSI, a composite site of the Norfolk Valley Fens SAC, both alone and in combination with other site allocations. Each allocation (MIN 111, MIN 102, MIN 107, MIN 108 & MIN 110) would need to clearly demonstrate no adverse impacts on the European site.
English Heritage: - There are a number of listed buildings in Shropham, including the Grade I listed St Peter's Church, which could be affected by any of these site allocations. The cumulative impact of all three sites would exacerbate the impact.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - The site could contain nationally important glacial and interglacial deposits, particularly buried terrace sedimentary archives. It would be useful to retain some open faces for scientific study during the operational stages, and ideally after restoration. Working this site would allow further study to link with previous geological investigations at Shropham Pit.
Public/parish council comments: - The main concerns raised were excessive noise and dust production, the impact on local wildlife, landscape and ramblers/cyclists, and the long-term (and possibly continuing) nature of minerals extraction in the area.
Conclusion: The site is potentially acceptable for inert fill only, subject to reduction in area to protect residential amenity, and to satisfactory highway access.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 79 (also submitted as mineral site MIN102)
Parish Snetterton
Location of siteLand at North Farm
Submitted byEnnstone Johnston Limited
Proposed use/sInert landfill, secondary aggregate recycling
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)58.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is an area of farmland with seven fields and four blocks of woodland. The village of Shropham is to the west and the hamlet of North End is to the south-west. A country road runs on an east-west axis to the south of the site. On this road, close to the south-eastern corner of the site is a set of kennels for dogs that need new homes. At the south-western corner is North Farm, there is a facility for training horses. The fields close to the farm are dedicated to horse husbandry, and have a parkland feel. 
Landscape: Views from the west, north and east would be largely screened by woodland. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction, and infilling with waste would be dependent on prior mineral extraction. The assessment for mineral extraction was that the main impact would be on the residents at North Farm and the buildings close-by. Any excavation in the three fields adjacent would have a detrimental visual effect. The visual impact on the North Farm complex from excavation in the adjacent fields would be unacceptable, and the prolongation of operations by importing inert waste would exacerbate this. Beyond this, the combination of landform and woodland would help to minimise the visual impact of mineral extraction on this site. The most appropriate restoration would be to arable farmland with blocks of woodland.
Ecology: Swangey Fen SSSI, CWS 645,CWS 809 are nearby in the Thet valley. In ecological terms, restoration to a conservation after-use would greatly enhance the site.
Highways: The site is north of the C471 North Road, which has no specific designation within the County Council’s route hierarchy. The A11(T) lies some 1.8km to the south-east and is approached via the C138 Local Access Route (Hargham Road). However, access should only be provided via the C823 Swangey Lane (an HGV Access Route) which is 2.8km from the A11(T). The surrounding highways are narrow in width and suffer from poor alignment. Access needs to be provided via the C823 Swangey Lane only (an HGV Access Route), and improvements will be required to this road.
Archaeology: Some archaeological work would be needed. Potential applicants will be required to submit the results of a programme of archaeological evaluation with any planning application.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken. However, the site was included in the ‘Issues and Options’ consultation in 2008 as site MIN102 for mineral extraction and the following responses to the 2008 consultation are relevant to this site.
Environment Agency: - Groundwater: Major Aquifer. Source Protection Zones 2&3.
Highways Agency: - The key issue for the Highways Agency is the potential impact of additional traffic, predominantly HGVs, at the point of access to the trunk road network. Cumulatively, sites MIN111, MIN107, MIN108, MIN110 and MIN102 may have an impact on the A11/Hargham Road grade-separated junction. Although this junction does not currently have a poor safety record or capacity issue of note, cumulatively the impact of the above sites may be detrimental in terms of safety and/or capacity. It is recommended that assessment should be carried out if more than one of the sites is proposed simultaneously.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - The site could contain nationally important glacial and interglacial deposits, particularly buried terrace sedimentary archives. It would be useful to retain some open faces for scientific study during the operational stages, and ideally after restoration. Working this site would allow further study to link with previous geological investigations at Shropham Pit.
Public/parish council comments: - No comments
Conclusion: the site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape, amenity and highways reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 19
Parish Snetterton
Location of siteHarling Road, Snetterton
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Limited.
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, HWRC, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification (including wood waste), energy from waste, and landfill of bio-stabilised waste.
Acceptable use/sAs above.
Size of site (hectares)3.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; HWRC 2,500; landfill 30,000.
Background Information: The site comprises a mineral working, concrete batching plant, HWRC and a landfill gas powered electricity generating plant. The site adjoins a closed landfill site (to the east) and industrial development to the north and west.
Landscape: The local landscape is already degraded by existing uses of the site and by nearby industrial development, and subject to design and screening of new development, the uses proposed could be accommodated in landscape terms. Opportunities for heathland restoration should be sought for areas to be restored.
Ecology: The site is not of any particular ecological significance, but its wider surroundings include County Wildlife Sites 620, 621, 622, and 623. 
Highways: Access is gained off Heath Road, which links with the A11(T) junction 400m to the north-west. Continued use of this access would be acceptable to the County Highway Authority for the uses proposed, subject to appropriate visibility splays. 
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Partnership: The site is in a current mineral extraction site developed in Pleistocene glacial till and outwash deposits of the Anglian Lowestoft Formation and has been the subject of research. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
Environment Agency: Note that the site is above a major aquifer. Bio-stabilised waste would need to be tested to determine its category (eg whether it is inert/non-hazardous. Landfill would necessitate a natural geological protection barrier against the escape/through-flow of polluting leachate into sensitive or protected groundwater supplies.
Highways Agency: Raise no objection in principle.
Breckland District Council: There are minimal landscape issues as the site is surrounded by other industrial uses. The site is within the Snetterton Heath Employment Allocation as designated in the 1999 Breckland Local Plan and is within a proposed General Employment Area in the emerging Breckland Core Strategy. The site is currently used for various waste and minerals related uses. The site, if developed, could manage waste from settlements along the A11 corridor, some of which will grow over the plan period. Evidence from the NCC Preferred options on its minerals and waste core strategy suggest there is not a need for more landfill sites over the plan period.
Parish/public concerns: Quidenham Parish Council refer to years of noise and smell from the landfill, and will seek to prevent any further erosion in the quality of people's lives. It is within a few hundred metres from the nearest dwelling. The proposed usage of this site has changed so dramatically on several occasions over the last few months and goes far beyond anything previously envisaged. Any industrial process on this site will have a major impact, and is contrary to the Core Strategy Document. Waste processing is no longer appropriate for this site, given the plans to develop high tech industry on Snetterton Heath. Should be a serious debate as to how these proposals fit in with Breckland Council's plans for Snetterton Heath.
Conclusion: the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 32
Parish Thetford
Location of siteThetford Transfer Station, Burrell Way
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, household waste recycling centre, pyrolysis and gasification
Acceptable use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre
Size of site (hectares)0.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Composting 10,000; anaerobic digestion 5,000; HWRC 5,000; other recycling 50,000.
Background Information: The site is an existing waste transfer station within a large industrial estate to the south of the London Road. The site contains an industrial type of building with concreted vehicle circulation areas. 
Landscape: Development on the site within an industrial estate could be accommodated in principle without unacceptable landscape impact. 
Ecology: The site is close to the Breckland Forest SSSI, one of as number of SSSIs which make up the Breckland SAC, and Natural England advise that developments which include thermal treatment and pyrolysis have the potential to impact adversely on the area. For such developments to be allocated it would need to be demonstrated clearly that no adverse impacts on the European site would result.
Highways: The site is located on Burrell Way, a private street. The C587 London Road, an HGV route, is approximately 400m to the north by road, and the A11(T) is 600m. There are no access issues from the County Highway Authority point of view.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England: Note potential adverse impacts on a number of component SSSIs which make up the Breckland SAC, including Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SSSI due to aerial deposition from thermal treatment and pyrolysis, both alone and in combination with other site allocations WAS 63, WAS 04 & WAS 03. Each allocation would need to clearly demonstrate no adverse impacts on the European site.
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concern over potential adverse impacts on SSSI and SAC heaths of airborne nutrients from thermal treatment and pyrolysis.
Environment Agency: New development would require an environmental permit. In the case of proposals for thermal treatment the Agency require detailed information on emissions and proposals for disposing of residual material.
Highways Agency: The site would have a significant impact on the A11 junction with London Road, and have an estimated 100 HGV and 1200 car movements per day (due to the HWRC proposal). The Agency require assessment of that impact prior to its consideration as a preferred site.
Breckland District Council: The planned growth of Thetford will mean a large increase in the waste that the town generates, therefore there is a need for a local facility to treat and manage this waste. The site is on brownfield land within the London Road Industrial site. There are a number of uses proposed for the site; however, it appears that Norfolk County Council has only tested the household recycling centre through sustainability appraisal. The uses proposed could help manage the extra waste that will be generated by the town. Do not object, but ensure all proposed uses are tested through sustainability appraisal.
Parish/public concerns: Traffic should use the bypass and not, for example, the Bury Road; objections to thermal treatment on grounds of relatively high climate change external cost impacts, lack of monitoring of fine particles, and need for specialist toxic disposal of fly ash.
Conclusion: Subject to the requirements of the Highways Agency for a prior assessment of the impact on the junction of the C587 London Road with the A11(T), and the omission of thermal treatment and pyrolysis/gasification, the site is potentially acceptable for consideration as a preferred site. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 3
Parish Wretham
Location of siteAdjoining Larkshall Mill, East Wretham
Submitted byPearsons (Thetford) Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)5.3
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is a tree belt, to the north of the existing industrial developments at the former Larkshall Mill, which are accessed off the A1075. Waste management and recycling operations were granted permission at Larkshall Mill in 2006.
Landscape: The surrounding countryside comprises arable farmland with woodland plantations, and some poultry sheds. Loss of trees on this site, and new development on it, together with the consequent opening up of views of the neighbouring industrial development, would have a serious impact on the landscape. This would conflict with landscape policies. The site is not suitable in landscape terms.
Ecology: Breckland SPA, Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SAC, and numerous CWSs are in the vicinity. Concern over potential nutrient deposition (airborne) and disturbance impacts on nearby SAC/SPA sites.
Highways: The site would be accessed off the A1075 Thetford Road, a principal route. There would be a need for a right turn lane into the site.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England: Potential adverse impacts of a number of component SSSIs which make up the Breckland SAC, including Bridgham and Brettenham Heaths SSSI (note the correct SSSI name), due to aerial deposition from thermal treatment and pyrolysis, both alone and in combination with other site allocations WAS 63, WAS 32, and WAS 04. Each allocation would need to clearly demonstrate no adverse impacts on the European site.
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concern over potential adverse impacts on SSSI and SAC heaths of airborne nutrients from thermal treatment and pyrolysis.
Highways Agency: Where sites are proposed for mixed-use, the land-use which is forecast to generate the greatest quantity of trips is assumed for the purposes of estimating the number of daily movements. Although there is no indication that the waste site proposed would require direct access to the Trunk Road Network, a broad indication of the sites and junctions of the A11, A47 and A12 where waste management is likely to have the most significant impact – Assuming the most direct route (in accordance with Norfolk County Council’s road hierarchy plan) is taken to access the TRN, is stated below: Site WAS 3 would have the most significant impact on the A11 junction with the A1075, and have an estimated 100 HGV and 20 car movements per day. A broad overview as to the potential, worst-case cumulative daily traffic impacts at those trunk road junctions identified (if all waste sites were to go ahead), is as follows, and sets out the maximum daily traffic which would occur under this situation. The A11 trunk road junction with the A1075 – affected by sites WAS 04, 03 and 63 is a full grade-separated junction. These sites would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 300 HGVs and 60 cars and less than one personal injury accidents per year over a 5 year period. 
Breckland District Council: Object. The site adjoins the existing waste management facility in Wretham along the A1075 from Watton to Thetford. The site consists of a tree belt that screens the existing facility from the views from the north. Therefore the development of the site would mean the loss of the tree belt and therefore create exposed views of the proposed development and existing development. The surrounding landscape is classed as ‘Stanta heath’ on the Breckland Landscape Character Assessment. The LCA highlights the importance of woodland blocks like the tree belt where the allocation is proposed in this landscape character type. The site is within the Breckland Air Quality Management Area and some of the proposed uses for the site could exacerbate the existing air quality issues in this area.
Parish/public concerns: Significant adverse impacts on the landscape as well as the woodland area bordering the A1075. The woods currently hide the huge industrial complex from sight as well as help shelter the area. The site is within close proximity to the Forestry Commission land, the Peddars Way route and the Pingo trail. The creation of a large industrial area in a rural setting will be a blot on the landscape. There are also objections on grounds of ecological damage, loss of amenity (noise, dust and smell), air and water pollution, impact on tourism (camping and public rights of way), loss of motocross club track, and highway and traffic concerns.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape grounds.

View Comments (1) 7.4 Broadland Waste Allocation Sites

Site Reference View Comments (7) View Map WAS18
ParishAttlebridge
Location of site Attlebridge Landfill site, Reepham Road
Submitted byBiffa Waste Services Ltd
Proposed use/s Processing of recyclables, landfill (non-hazardous waste), regrading of non-landfill area with inert material excavated from proposed landfill extension area.
Acceptable use/s As above
Size of site (hectares) 37.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a. Landfill 100,000 tpa for 8 years. Processing of recyclables 25,000
Background Information: The site is a large area adjacent to an active landfill, to the south of its internal access road off the south side of the C261 Reepham Road. Included within the site are parts of the active area containing leachate treatment and landfill gas powered electricity generating plant. Only the western half of the proposed area would be used for landfill. Soils removed from the western half to create the landfill void would be spread on the eastern half of the site
Landscape: The site lies in an area of undulating farmland with large blocks of woodland, beyond the northern edge of the Wensum Valley, and just to the west of the outer fringes of the built-up of area Norwich. Marriott’s Way passes along the northern boundary of the site, and the site can also be seen from FirCovert Road the east. Subject to the recycling area being sited further south; to provision of a substantial buffer to Marriott’s Way and Fir Covert Road, and to addressing impact on views from residential property, the site would be more acceptable in landscape terms
Ecology: The woodland abutting the north-western boundaries of the site is designated as a County Wildlife Site (1344 Triumph & Foxburrow Plantations). Another County Wildlife Site (1343 Attlebridge Hills) abuts the existing landfill site, to the south. Further woodland lies close to the southern site boundary. Open ground habitat would be lost, but there would be potential for restoration of the site to woodland. The resulting linking of existing woodland habitats would be a significant benefit
Highways: Access as existing off Reepham Road, a designated HGV route, is satisfactory for the development proposed, subject to a routing agreement to keep vehicles on a HGV route only
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: There is potential for heathland restoration in line with adjacent waste site
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is in an area of extensive category Pleistocene [Anglian] glacio-fluvial outwash gravels. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections and landforms for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at district or local levels
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency (EA) advise that the site overlays a major aquifer. Development over a major aquifer may be suitable where there is a substantial, natural low permeability geological barrier to prevent long term pollution. On this basis the EA object to this site
National Grid PLC: This site is crossed by National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines
Airfield Safeguarding: The site is within the Norwich Airport Bird Strike Zone, and is also within the RAF Coltishall Bird Strike Zone (although that airfield is now closed)
Broadland District Council: The site is in close proximity to the River Wensum, an internationally designated area of nature conservation importance. A County Wildlife Site (CWS) is immediately adjacent to the east of the site. The assessment needs to take these factors into account.
Parish/public concerns: Site close to residential development. The amenities of the occupants would be affected by increased HGV traffic, noise and odours from the proposed recycling facility, excavation and landfill. Increase in HGV traffic through Drayton. Potential for fly-tipping and wind blown dust and litter. Concern about vehicles taking a short cut through Attlebridge using Station Road where lorries have damaged verges, banks and flint wall at church corner.
Conclusion: the site is potentially acceptable for the developments proposed, but subject to additional information concerning siting of the recycling area, visual screening, Environment Agency requirements, airfield safeguarding, and gas pipeline safeguarding

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 24 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 55)
Parish Attlebridge
Location of site Keeper’s Cottage, Attlebridge
Submitted by Mrs D Mattioli
Proposed use/s Composting, and landfill of inert and/or non-hazardous waste
Acceptable use/s As above
Size of site (hectares)1.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a. Composting 20,000. Landfill void unknown.
Background Information: The site comprises an isolated dwelling known as Keepers Cottage and its wider curtilage, including outbuildings. It lies at the north-western end of Attlebridge landfill site, restored areas of which encircle the site
Landscape: Aside from the landfill, the site lies in an area of undulating farmland with large blocks of woodland, beyond the northern edge of the Wensum Valley. Public right of way Attlebridge RB4 follows the access track to the property and then meets Attlebridge RB3 which runs past the south-west boundary of the site. Only a narrow glimpse of the site can be seen from these paths
Ecology: The woodland abutting the north-western boundaries of the site is designated as a County Wildlife Site (1344 Triumph & Foxburrow Plantations). Buildings and mature trees on the site proposed would need to be surveyed as potential habitats for bats. Restoration to heathland/grassland would be preferable
Highways: Access to the adjacent landfill site is off the C261 Reepham Road, a designated HGV route. This access would be satisfactory for the development proposed, subject to a routing agreement to keep vehicles on a HGV route only. Direct access to the A1067 Fakenham Road would not be acceptable
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: Likely to lead to impact on extensive category Pleistocene [Anglian] glacio-fluvial outwash gravels. Landfill may remove access to sections and landforms for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at district or local levels
Airfield Safeguarding: The site is within the Norwich Airport Bird Strike Zone, and is also within the RAF Coltishall Bird Strike Zone (although that airfield is now closed)
Environment Agency: Object. Advise that the site overlays a major aquifer. Development over a major aquifer may be suitable where there is a substantial, natural low permeability geological barrier to prevent long term pollution
Broadland District Council: The River Wensum, approximately half a kilometre south of the site, also provides water supply for Norwich and surrounding areas the possibility of affecting the water supply needs to be assessed. The River Wensum, approximately half a kilometre south of the site, is not only an SSSI, but also an internationally designated area of nature conservation importance (SAC). The site itself also falls in a County Wildlife Site as indicated in Broadland District Local Plan. These factors need to be taken into account
Parish/public concerns: Objection to large increase in HGV traffic on the routes and from the site and also through the village of Drayton. Access from the A1067 should be prohibited
Conclusion: The site is potentially acceptable for the developments proposed, subject to Environment Agency and airfield safeguarding requirements

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 22
Parish Buxton with Lammas
Location of site

Mayton Wood Landfill Site, Little Hautbois Road

Submitted by

Norfolk Environmental Waste Services Limited

Proposed use/s

Landfill for biostabilised waste

Acceptable use/s

None

Size of site (hectares)

9.4

Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.

N/A

Background Information: The site is an active sand and gravel working situated to the north of the former Mayton Wood landfill, which is undergoing final restoration. The site lies within the countryside on a plateau above the River Bure. The former RAF Coltishall airfield is within 1km to the north-east, beyond the river.
Landscape: The site is not readily visible from public viewpoints, and subject to use of the existing access, and to operations, including stockpiles, being kept low, it would have a relatively low landscape impact. A restoration scheme not requiring a domed profile would be acceptable, and it would also need to be compatible with the restored landform of the adjacent former landfill.
Ecology: No special ecological issues arise. The site would have potential for restoration to heathland or grassland, which would be preferable to woodland.
Highways: Access is shared with the former landfill site and HWRC, off the west side of the C532. This leads to the B1354 Main Distributor Route 1km to the south, via the C494. Subject to possible financial contributions to a programmed improvement scheme of works to the B1354, the proposal could be accommodated
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: Mayton Bridge to the east of the site is both scheduled and listed at Grade II*, while Hautbois Hall to the north-east is also listed at Grade II*
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is in mineral workings adjacent to the former Mayton Wood Quarry with its history of research. It may lead to impact on local Pleistocene extensive geological resources including the Wroxham and Happisburgh and Lowestoft Formations. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at district or local levels.
Environment Agency: Object. Site is proposed as a non-hazardous/biostabilised landfill that we have assumed will require active long term site management. The site overlays a major aquifer. Development over a major aquifer may be suitable where there is a substantial, natural low permeability geological barrier to prevent long term pollution. It is our experience of the site that there no such barrier.
Broadland District Council: The proposal may have an impact on the County Wildlife Site (CWS) which lies close to the east of the site. The assessment also has not taken account of the impact on nearby dwellings
Parish/public concerns: Impact of increased lorry traffic on minor roads, and on amenity in Hainford; B1354 not suitable; site could generate additional traffic through Coltishall and Horstead on the B1150 and B1354, and along the B1354 to Wroxham; cumulative effect must be considered in conjunction with existing and proposed waste and mineral sites, and development at the former RAF Coltishall
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site due to the Environment Agency objection

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 68 (also submitted as mineral site MIN37)
Parish Buxton with Lammas and Frettenham
Location of site Land near Mayton Wood landfill site, Little Hautbois Road
Submitted by Frimstone Limited
Proposed use/s Landfilling with inert waste
Acceptable use/s None
Size of site (hectares)23.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is to the west of the former Mayton Wood landfill, which is undergoing final restoration. To the north-east is an active sand and gravel quarry.
Landscape: The site lies within the countryside on a plateau above the River Bure. The former RAF Coltishall airfield is within 1km to the north-east. The site is open to views from Coltishall Road to the west, from Frettenham Road to the east and from a public right of way (Frettenham FP2) which crosses the southern part of the site. Consideration of the impact on the amenities of occupiers of nearby dwellings would also result constrain development on the site.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest. The site would have potential for restoration to include mixed species hedgerow and woodland
Highways: The C494 Coltishall Road passes the south-west boundary, and is recorded as a Local Access Route in the County Council’s route hierarchy. Should access be to the C494, traffic would travel south-east for 800m onto the B1354, a Main Distributor route, and then to the A140 at Hainford. Widening has been carried out on the B1354 between the A140 and Waterloo, however the remaining section to the C494 Buxton Road will also require widening, towards which the applicant may need to make a financial contribution. No outstanding transport issues that could not be addressed with an application, subject to a financial contribution towards improvement works along the B1354 and C494
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, this site was included as proposed mineral site MIN 37 in the ‘Issues and Options’ consultation in 2008. The following responses received to the 2008 consultation are relevant to this site
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: - The site is adjacent to the former Mayton Wood Quarry with its history of research, and may extraction may reveal local Pleistocene extensive geological resources including the Wroxham and Happisburgh Formations. It would be useful to retain some open faces for scientific study during the operational stages, and ideally after restoration
Broadland District Council: - The assessment also has not taken account of the impact on nearby dwellings
Public/parish council comments: - The main concern expressed was the cumulative impact of traffic on the B1354
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape and amenity reasons

Site Reference No. View Comments (8) View Map WAS 17
Parish Frettenham, Buxton with Lammas, Horstead with Stanninghall
Location of site Mayton Wood Landfill Site, Little Hautbois Road
Submitted by Norfolk Environmental Waste Services Limited
Proposed use/s Composting, anaerobic digestion, waste transfer, HWRC, mixed waste processing, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification, and energy from waste.
Acceptable use/s Continuation of existing HWRC only
Size of site (hectares)23.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.HWRC 5,000
Background Information: The site is a former landfill, undergoing final restoration, having operated for more than 30 years. A landfill gas powered electricity generating plant was permitted in 1994. The site also contains a HWRC and a temporary composting operation. An active sand and gravel working lies to the north
Landscape: The site lies within the countryside on a plateau above the River Bure. The former RAF Coltishall airfield is within 1km to the north-east, beyond the river. It is remote from any village, although there are some isolated dwellings in the vicinity. Any permanent waste management development in this rural setting would not be acceptable
Ecology: Subject to survey, no special ecological issues arise at the local level, although the ecological impact on the wider area of emissions to air in particular would need to be considered in relation to some of the uses proposed
Highways: Access to the site is off the west side of the C532. This leads to the B1354 Main Distributor Route 1km to the south, via the C494. Subject to possible financial contributions to a programmed improvement scheme of works to the B1354, the uses proposed could be accommodated in highway terms
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: The site overlays a major aquifer. Development over a major aquifer may be suitable where there is a substantial, natural low permeability geological barrier to prevent long term pollution. No such barrier exists at the site
Broadland District Council: The site is proposed to be used as a composting site. There is likely to be an adverse impact on residential amenities, i.e. odour
Parish/public concerns: Impact of increased lorry traffic on minor roads, and on amenity and quality of life of residents along the B1354 to the A140 at Hainford. The site could generate additional traffic through Coltishall and Horstead on the B1150 and B1354, and along the B1354 to Wroxham. Cumulative effect must be considered in conjunction with existing and proposed waste and mineral sites, and development at the former RAF Coltishall
Conclusion: Except for continued operation or expansion of the existing HWRC, the site should not be considered further as a preferred site for any of the uses proposed, on landscape and amenity grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 73
ParishMarsham
Location of siteLand at Wood Farm, Marsham
Submitted byMr R Crane
Proposed use/sComposting and anaerobic digestion
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)3.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.45,000
Background Information: A composting operation is currently carried out on part of the site. On the 20 March 2009 the County Council’s Planning (Regulatory) Committee considered a report on a planning application (C/5/2008/5012), for composting facilities for green/organic/timber wastes and commercial food waste. It was resolved to grant conditional permission subject also to a Section106 agreement. As of August 2009 a formal decision had not been issued
Landscape: The site contains a permitted small scale green and timber waste composting facility, a bungalow, farm buildings and adjacent agricultural land. It lies in open countryside and can be seen from surrounding roads. Landscaping and screening is proposed, taking the form of earth bunds and extensive belts of planting to the north and east. The impact would be reduced as planting matures. The proposed six passing bays on Buxton Road are unlikely to have a detrimental effect on the existing trees along the road, and the essential rural character of the area would be retained. The site is considered to be acceptable in landscape terms
Ecology: Surveys for protected species and potential habitats have been undertaken. The results suggest that overall the site is considered to be of a lower value for wildlife at the District scale. Mitigation has been proposed, including peripheral landscaping and screening, which would add to biodiversity of the area. Buxton Heath, a site of international importance (part of the Norfolk Valley Fens Special Area of Conservation (SAC)) and of national importance (also a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)) is situated approximately 1.0km to the south-west of the site. Cawston and Marsham Heaths SSSI is situated approximately 0.7km to the north-west of the site. The proposal would not have any adverse impact on these areas. There is no objection to the proposal on ecological grounds
Highways: The site is located adjacent to the C264 Buxton Road, which is a Main Distributor in the County Council’s route hierarchy. It is capable of taking two-way traffic for much of its length, but the narrower section from Wood Farm to the A140 would require improvement by the provision of passing places to mitigate the impact of the additional HGVs which would be generated. The A140 at the junction with the C264 is now subject to a 50mph limit and has central hatching.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken. Consultee responses on the planning application for composting are contained in the Committee report referred to above.
Conclusion: Given the resolution of the Committee, the site should be considered as a preferred site for composting, and for anaerobic digestion where this can be accommodated without unacceptable harm to the landscape

Site Reference No. View Comments (11) View Map WAS 76
ParishMorton-on-the-Hill
Location of siteSPC Atlas Works, Lenwade
Submitted byLanpro
Proposed use/sExtension to existing scrap metal recycling facility
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)0.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site lies within an allocated employment area, and comprises brownfield land adjacent to an existing metal processing plant to the south and east. The northern boundary of the site is adjacent to Marriott’s Way long distance footpath, which runs along the southern side of the Wensum valley
Landscape: The Wensum valley is a recognised landscape asset of importance with the river designated as a Special Conservation Area. Private dwellings lie to the east off the A1067, and to the north-west. Insensitive development of this site could have an adverse impact of the users of the long distance path to the north and the wider landscape of the Wensum valley. The wider area is relatively tranquil although it is accepted that this site adjoins a relatively noisy industrial process. Development proposals would need to show how operations on the site could be implemented and screened to minimise adverse impact on residents, users of the Marriott’s Way and the Wensum valley.
Ecology: The site itself is of no particular ecological interest, but the following are within 1km radius:
County Wildlife Site 1346 circa 20 metres to the north of the site (beyond Marriott’s Way), County Wildlife Site 1349 circa 268 m to the north west, County Wildlife Site 1347 circa 493m to the east, River Wensum SSSI and SAC just over 100m to the north, Alderford Common SSSI just over 1km to the north-east.
Highways: The site is accessed from the A1067 Norwich Road, which is a Principal Route in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. Access proposals for the site indicate that it would be served via a new/improved access with the A1067 with a dedicated right-turn lane. Subject to the access being able to achieve the appropriate visibility standards, it would be likely to be acceptable on highway terms. The existing points of access should be rationalised, to retain only one access to the A1067
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site

Site Reference No. View Comments (11) View Map WAS 78
ParishMorton-on-the-Hill, Weston Longville
Location of siteSPC Atlas Works, Lenwade
Submitted byLanpro
Proposed use/sMixed waste reprocessing, metal recycling, inert waste recycling, in-vessel composting, thermal, physical, chemical and/or biological treatment of waste, waste transfer.
Acceptable use/sAs above and other forms of residual waste treatment
Size of site (hectares)8.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.150,000 minimum for residual waste treatment
Background Information: This large site lies within an allocated employment area, and comprises industrial land, formerly the “Atlas Works? which produced reinforced concrete building components. Some parts of the site are unoccupied. The northern boundary of the site is adjacent to Marriott’s Way long distance footpath, which runs along the southern side of the Wensum valley. The site includes the area put forward for consideration as a preferred site under reference WAS76.
Landscape: The Wensum valley is a recognised landscape asset of importance with the river designated as a Special Conservation Area. Private dwellings lie to the east off the A1067, and to the north-west. Insensitive development of this site could have an adverse impact of the users of the long distance path to the north and the wider landscape of the Wensum valley. The wider area is relatively tranquil although it is accepted that this site includes a relatively noisy industrial process. Development proposals would need to show how operations on the site could be implemented and screened to minimise adverse impact on residents, users of the Marriott’s Way and the Wensum valley.
Ecology: The site itself is of no particular ecological interest, but the following are within 1km radius:
CWS 1346 circa 20 metres to the north of the site (beyond Marriott’s Way)
CWS 1349 circa 35 m to the north west
CWS 1347 circa 420m to the east
River Wensum SSSI just over 100m to the north
Alderford Common SSSI 800m to the north-east.
Highways: The site is accessed from the A1067 Norwich Road, which is a Principal Route in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. Access proposals for the site indicate that it would be served via a new/improved access with the A1067 with a dedicated right-turn lane. Subject to the access being able to achieve the appropriate visibility standards, it would be acceptable on highway terms. The existing points of access should be rationalised, to retain only one access to the A1067
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site subject to responses from external consultees

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 48
ParishRackheath
Location of site5 Wendover Road, Rackheath Industrial Estate
Submitted byParkers Skip Hire Limited
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)1.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is adjacent to an existing Materials Recycling Facility on the Rackheath Industrial Estate, off Green Lane West.
Landscape: The site is well screened from public viewpoints by a thick roadside hedge. The proposal would amount to a northerly extension of the industrial estate onto non-allocated land. Subject to the scale of development, it is unlikely to be visually intrusive in the wider landscape nor would it have a detrimental impact on landscape character. The amenities of residents could be adversely affected by the erection of bulky buildings or other structures on the site, and by an extension northward of activities of an industrial nature
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest.
Highways: Access is via Wendover Road to the C258 Green Lane West, which is designated as an HGV access in the route hierarchy. The junction with the 1151Wroxham Road is not able to cater for additional HGV traffic from this site
External Consultee Comments:
Broadland District Council: There are potential visual and noise impacts for neighbouring properties. Access and impacts on the junction are major concerns
Parish/public concerns: Concern about management of the site regarding nuisance and amenity issues. Note history of complaints. This proposal would extend the site even closer to residential properties and would increase adverse impact from noise, smell and traffic. Concern that works in the Wroxham/Hoveton area would cause an increase in traffic particularly HGV movements along the A1151 or the B1140 through the village
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for highway and local amenity reasons

Site Reference No. View Comments (2) View Map WAS 50
ParishStratton Strawless
Location of siteLand Off Edwin Way, Short Thorn Road
Submitted byK&S Skip Hire
Proposed use/sWaste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)0.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is a former storage depot. It is bounded by open countryside to the south and a small residential estate to the north, but otherwise is within a rural setting
Landscape: The site lies off Short Thorn Road which has been subject to ribbon development for a number of years, with small scale industrial uses interspersed with residential plots. Notwithstanding piecemeal development over the years, the proposal would not be acceptable in landscape terms
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed in a planning application.
Highways: The site is located off the C245 Short Thorn Road, which has no specific designation within the route hierarchy. The A140 HGV Route is 1.7km to the east. Access to the site off the C245 suffers from poor visibility. The site is not suitable in highways terms.
External Consultee Comments:
Broadland District Council: Note concerns over visual impact, noise and traffic.
Parish/public concerns: Risk of vermin, and smells in a residential area. Heavy and light traffic would use a road, already heavily used, created for the new residential area off Short Thorn Road. The siting of this type of operation within a high value residential area/site is totally unacceptable
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for highways, landscape and amenity reasons

View Comments (2) 7.5 Great Yarmouth Waste Allocation Sites

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Map WAS 74 - SITE WITHDRAWN
ParishBurgh Castle
Location of siteWelcome Pit, Butt Lane
Submitted byFolkes Plant and Aggregates Limited
Proposed use/sInert waste storage
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)1.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.5,000
Background Information: Welcome Pit lies on elevated land with a mix of farmland and caravan parks. Open marshland to the north and west lies within the Broads Authority Area. The site, an unrestored area used for storage, forms part of the existing mineral working. The existing quarry has been in existence for many years and has some permanent industrial type uses. Planning permission for extraction of sand and use of land for storage of skips and inert recyclable materials forming an extension to an existing operational area? was granted on Site74 in September 2009 (C/6/2009/6002).
Landscape: The development would be contained within the existing quarry and would not impact on the setting of the Broads. It would be screened form views from Butt Lane by woodland but any noisy activities may intrude into the rural landscape.uThere is potential to improve the screening along the northern and eastern boundaries.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest.
Highways: The site is located on the C603 Butt Lane which is a Tourist Access Route in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. It is approximately 2.5km from the site to the A143 Beccles Road which is a Principal Route in the Route Hierarchy (via C620 New Road which is a Local Access Route).
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: Subject to screening along the northern and eastern boundaries of the quarry, the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the use proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 49
ParishGreat Yarmouth
Location of siteOld Lindgreat Site, Harfreys Road,
Submitted byEast Coast Waste Limited
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)0.3
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.HWRC 5,000, Recycling/processing/transfer 25,000
Background Information: The site is on the Harfreys Industrial Estate, west of the River Yare and the A12.
Landscape: The site is visible from Harfreys Road within the industrial estate and can be glimpsed from the A12. Other waste management developments have been permitted and operate in the vicinity. In its context the uses proposed would have a low impact in landscape terms.
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecological issues.
Highways: The site is a short distance to the south of the C631 Harfreys Road, which is an HGV Access Route in the Route Hierarchy. Harfreys Road has a roundabout junction with the A12. There are no outstanding transport issues that could not be addressed with an application and would be supported as a preferred option in transport terms.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Note that the site is above a Major Aquifer, and is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. Object on flood risk grounds, and require a Flood Risk Assessment.
Highways Agency: Require assessment of the suitability of the junction with the A12(T).
Great Yarmouth Borough Council: The site is covered by the Great Yarmouth Borough-Wide Local Plan (2001) policies for an Existing Employment Area (EMP 8, 9 & 11-15). The site is currently vacant however the Great Yarmouth Local Development Framework has identified a need for 22 hectares of B2 (General Industry) uses up to 2021. The Council therefore objects to the proposal as the site should remain in employment use.
Parish/public comments: A proposal for a recycling "sorting bay" should be included to maximise the proportion of materials able to be recycled.
Conclusion: subject to assessments as required by the Environment and Highways Agencies, the site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 66
ParishGreat Yarmouth
Location of siteHarfreys Road, Harfreys Industrial Estate
Submitted byEast Coast Waste Limited
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)1.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.HWRC 5,000; recycling/processing/transfer 50,000
Background Information: The site is an area of undeveloped land behind frontage development on the eastern side of the Harfreys Industrial Estate, west of the River Yare and adjacent to the A12 Trunk Road.
Landscape: The site is visible from the A12(T) and the northern part of Harfreys Road. Other waste management developments have been permitted and operate in the vicinity. Whilst most of the site is on designated industrial land and would have a developed backdrop, it is a gateway corridor site alongside the A12(T). Developing this site for waste processing, transfer, recycling or as a household waste recycling centre would have a detrimental impact in landscape terms unless a suitable landscape buffer could be provided along its eastern edge.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest.
Highways: The site has access to the C631 Harfreys Road, designated as an HGV access route in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. Harfreys Road has a roundabout junction with the A12(T). New development would add to congestion on the Gapton Hall roundabout, which falls under the control of the Highways Agency. Contribution towards improvements may be needed.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is above a Major Aquifer, and is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. The Agency therefore object on flood risk grounds, and would require a Flood Risk Assessment.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency require assessment of the suitability of the junction with the A12(T).
Great Yarmouth Borough Council: The site is covered by the Great Yarmouth Borough-Wide Local Plan (2001) policies for an Existing Employment Area (EMP 8, 9 & 11-15). The Great Yarmouth Local Development Framework has identified a need for 22 hectares of B2 (General Industry) uses up to 2021. There are potential adverse effects on the appearance of the industrial estate due to close proximity to the A12. The Council therefore objects to the proposal as the site should remain in employment use.
Parish/public comments: The proposed site should be screened with trees where it borders the A12 road, to reduce the site's visual impact. A proposal for a recycling "sorting bay" should be included to maximise the proportion of materials able to be recycled.
Conclusion: Subject to assessments as required by the Environment and Highways Agencies, and to inclusion of a landscape buffer with the A12, the site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 70
ParishGreat Yarmouth
Location of siteTown lands, Harfrey’s industrial Estate
Submitted byE E Green and Son Limited
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, including storage and shredding of wood and storage and processing of waste oils
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)2.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Recycling/processing 50,000; wood shredding 10,000; oil processing 5,000
Background Information: The site is at the southern edge of the Harfrey’s Industrial Estate, and is accessed from the north, via Harfrey’s Road. The road, which becomes a public right of way and cycle way (Great Yarmouth FP3), passes the east side of the site and joins Burgh Road. The A12 passes to the east, on an embankment. The land is currently used for recycling inert waste.
Landscape: The site is on industrial land but is sensitive due to the proximity of the housing and PROW/cycle way. Parts of the site can be seen from the east, from the cycle track and from the A12. Provided stockpiles are kept below the height of the bund, views to the south and south-west would be screened. Any development should be subject to suitable boundary treatment and stockpile height restrictions.
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecological issues. The ditch network need to be kept clear of rubbish, and checked for watervoles before any development takes place.
Highways: The site is located off the U62106 Harfrey’s Road which has no specific designation in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. To the north this becomes the C631 Harfrey’s Road, which is an HGV Access Route in the Route Hierarchy. Harfrey’s Road has a roundabout junction with the A12(T). Development of this site will add to congestion on the Gapton Hall roundabout. There is also concern about more intensive development of this site particularly with regard to the conflict between HGV traffic and pedestrians / cyclists using the route through to Burgh Road. May require segregation of cycle route, although land ownership in the area is unclear and width is restricted over bridge at the northern end of the site.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken, however the following comments are expected from the Environment Agency and Highways Agency.
Environment Agency: The site is above a Major Aquifer, and is within Flood Zones 2 and 3. The Agency are likely to object on flood risk grounds, and would require a Flood Risk Assessment.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency are likely to require assessment of the suitability of the roundabout junction with the A12(T).
Conclusion: subject to assessments as required by the Environment and Highways Agencies, the site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

View Comments (3) 7.6 King’s Lynn & West Norfolk Waste Allocation Sites

Site Reference No. View Comments (12) View Map WAS 12
ParishCrimplesham and West Dereham
Location of siteCrimplesham Quarry, Main Road, Crimplesham
Submitted byFrimstone Limited
Proposed use/sComposting , inert waste recycling, landfill
Acceptable use/sComposting , inert waste recycling, landfill
Size of site (hectares)27.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; recycling 25,000; landfill 60,000
Background Information: The site is within a quarry, part restored, which includes importation and recycling of inert waste, and is permitted until the end of 2011. The quarry is on the north side of Main Road, Crimplesham, and in 2009 a replacement quarry, with inert waste imports, was permitted on the south side of the road, until 2027.
Landscape: The site is well screened from surrounding viewpoints. One property on Mill Road would have a view from upstairs windows over part of the site. The site lies within an area of relatively tranquil landscape as defined on the CPRE map and an area of dark landscape as shown on the county map. The three uses proposed would have a low impact in landscape terms apart from the potential for delay in the ultimate restoration of the quarry. Further imports could result in an enhanced restoration, beneficial to the landscape and to biodiversity of the site. Composting, inert waste recycling and landfill would be compatible with the operation of an active mineral working, subject to restoration being achievable within acceptable timescales.
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed in a planning application. Restoration, and the creation of new habitats would benefit protected and Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) species, and help meet BAP habitat targets.
Highways: The quarry has an existing access off the C543 Main Road, at a point less that 700m east of the junction with the A134 Lynn Road, a Principal Route. Subject to HGV traffic not passing through the village of Crimplesham to the west, the use of the site for the categories of waste development proposed would be likely to be acceptable in highway terms.
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: There are a number of important historic features, including Grade II StMary’s Church to the west in Crimplesham, the grade I listed St Andrew’s Church to the south in West Dereham and the scheduled monastic grange and moat to the east affected by the proposed minerals and waste site allocations, exacerbated cumulatively if all three sites are utilised. There is also significant archaeological potential at the junction between Lynn Road and Lime Kiln, with an identified area of Romano-British occupation. Further research and analysis would be needed to assess the impact on these features.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Noise – Nearest receptor within 40 metres. Haulage noise may affect Stradsett. Cumulative effect and creeping background must be considered as another site allocation is in close proximity. The above should be considered in a SEMP (Site Emissions Management Plan). The site is not located close to any international or national designated sites for nature conservation. There are 4 local CWSs and therefore there may be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. Southwest of Manor Farm Ref 339, Thorn Plantation Ref 340, Osier Holt Ref 341, and Toombers Wood Ref 367. The proposal forms part of a complex of proposals in this area which would create an intensification of activity along the A134. The access to the site should be improved to provide a direct connection to the A134 to avoid use of unsuitable roads. Where this cannot be achieved the route is not suitable for waste vehicles. Other comments include need to control noise, air quality including dust and bioaerosols; lighting, odour, groundwater pollution, landfill gas control.
Parish/public concerns: Impact on wildlife and habitats; roads unsuitable for more traffic; further impact on village and amenity from noise and dust; cumulative impact with other sites; water pollution; bird strike hazard for aircraft.
Conclusion: the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed, on a temporary basis where restoration would not be prejudiced.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 45
ParishDocking
Location of siteoff B1454, Docking Common
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, HWRC, mixed waste processing, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification, energy from waste.
Acceptable use/sTemporary composting.
Size of site (hectares)8.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Composting 30,000
Background Information: The site comprises a former landfill site (now restored) and a household waste recycling facility (HWRC) which has permanent permission.
Landscape: The site is in the countryside between the villages of Docking and Stanhoe. Residential properties front onto the Fakenham Road 300m the south-east. Only uses appropriate for this rural location would be acceptable in landscape terms. As such, composting would be acceptable on the lower part of the site. Built development of a more permanent and industrial character would not be appropriate.
Ecology: The site itself, a recently restored landfill, is not of any special ecological interest. More information will be required to highlight any potential conflicts between the intended processes and biodiversity.
Highways: The existing access to this site is poor with sub-standard visibility, but the site has direct access onto the B1454 Fakenham Road, which is a Main Distributor in the Route Hierarchy. The site is well located in relation to the strategic highway network, but access improvements would be necessary to improve visibility.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Note the sensitivity of the underlying geology, and would require the site to be covered with a sealed impermeable surface to prevent leachate from waste entering the underlying major aquifer. Development would have to be compatible with leachate and gas management systems for the former landfill.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Any buildings should be at the extreme west of the site (on the site of the former Concrete Batching Plant). Appropriate scale and appearance of design may prove it to be compatible with the rural location. Access to the site is poor with restricted access and would need to be substantially improved to remove conflicts between waste vehicles. Concern at impact of lighting, odour and nuisance, noise, air quality, groundwater pollution and health risks from bio-aerosol emissions. Nearest noise receptor is within 400m. There will be existing noise from its current activity as a household waste recycling centre, however the proposed use may introduce other types of noise. Haulage could have a significant effect on receptors as they are close to the B1454. Cumulative effect of potential site allocation nearby must be accounted for and creeping background considered. The above should be considered in a SEMP.
Parish/public concerns: Concern about litter; unspecified wastes to be digested; effect on flora and fauna, and visibility at site access, route to be confined to ‘A’ roads only.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as preferred site for temporary composting only on landscape grounds.

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 46 - SITE WITHDRAWN
ParishDocking
Location of siteCharity Land Site, Docking Road, Docking
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Ltd
Proposed use/sLandfill of inert/bio-stabilised waste
Acceptable use/sinert waste landfill, for restoration only
Size of site (hectares)3.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.30,000
Background Information: The site comprises an excavated void in former arable land, and an area of scrubland. There is an area of woodland between the site and road frontage to the B1154 Fakenham Road, and is screened from public viewpoints. The site adjoins the former Docking landfill site, now restored (site WAS45).
Landscape: The site is in the countryside between the villages of Docking and Stanhoe. Residential properties front onto the Fakenham Road 250m the south-east. Only uses appropriate for this rural location would be acceptable in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest. Inert waste could be used to restore the contours of the site, which could then be planted to increase the existing habitat and connect with the existing woodland to the south. Lowland mixed deciduous woodland is a target habitat.
Highways: The existing access to the former landfill is poor with sub-standard visibility, but has direct access onto the B1454 Fakenham Road, which is a Main Distributor in the Route Hierarchy. The site is well located in relation to the strategic highway network, but improvements to the site access would be necessary to improve visibility.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Note that the site is above a major aquifer and next to a landfill. There is a known pollution plume from the landfill, affecting quality of groundwater to the north. The site was excavated to provide material for restoration of the landfill, and filling of the void with anything other than inert waste is unacceptable due to the potential to exacerbate the existing groundwater pollution. The bio-stabilised waste has the potential to be classified as Non-Hazardous and would require appropriate screening to determine its exact category. For landfill, the site will require the installation of a natural geological protection barrier against the escape / through-flow of polluting leachate into sensitive or protected groundwater supplies or controlled waters, even for inert waste deposition. Development would have to be compatible with leachate and gas management systems for the former landfill.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Access to the site is poor with restricted access and would need to be substantially improved to remove conflicts between waste users. Landfill does not support the waste hierarchy although the proximity of the site to deal with residues from composting and anaerobic digestion supports the use of the site. Access to the site is poor with restricted access and would need to be substantially improved to remove conflicts between waste vehicles. This site does not encapsulate any nature conservation designations. Protected species will need to be considered. Noise receptors are within 240m. There will be existing noise from the adjacent sites current activity as a household waste recycling centre, however the proposed use may introduce other types of noise and it is closer to receptors. Concern at impact of lighting, odour and lighting. Haulage could have a significant effect on receptors as they are close to the B1454. Cumulative effect of potential site allocation nearby must be accounted for and creeping background considered.
Parish/public concerns: Concern about litter; effect on flora and fauna; visibility at site access; existing road surface needs modification for additional traffic; route to be confined to ‘A’ roads only.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as preferred site only for inert waste import, for restoration.

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Map WAS 38 - SITE WITHDRAWN
ParishEast Winch
Location of siteLand off Fosters End Lane, East Winch
Submitted byMiddleton Aggregates Ltd
Proposed use/sNon-hazardous landfill
Acceptable use/sInert landfill only
Size of site (hectares)15.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site is a mineral working, which has been partially restored to wet pools with steep banks. The site is part of the Blackborough End complex of minerals and waste sites, and is 1km from the village of Blackborough End.
Landscape: The site is within a wider area of farmland and woodland landscape, north of the Nar valley. Fosters End Lane, a bridleway, East Winch BR4, passes the south-east boundary of the site, and serves as access to three dwellings approximately 200m to the east. The site is remote, but the unrestored part detracts from the rural appearance of the countryside.
Ecology: The site is adjacent to County Wildlife Site 434 “Disused Pit?. Some landfill of inert waste would help restore levels, and the site should ideally be restored to rough grassland/meadows. Areas that have already been restored to wet pools should be retained to form a mosaic of wetland habitats.
Highways:rThe site could be accessed via an internal haul road off the C822 Mill Drove which is an HGV Access Route in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy. This leads via East Winch Road to the A47(T). East Winch Road would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted. A haunching scheme has been proposed, and the Highways Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites.
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: English Heritage are concerned and raise objections concerning harmful impact of new development and structures, and a restored landform, on the setting of the scheduled remains of Blackborough Priory (also listed as a GradeII structure).
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site was once significant for its exposure of extensive category sediments of the Lower Cretaceous Sandringham Formation Leziate Beds and Carstone. Because of landscaping it has substantially lost its geodiversity interest. The proposed landfill is unlikely to affect access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: Object due to the sensitivity of the surrounding area. These sites are within close proximity to the Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI and also the River Nar. The Agency note that the site is above a major aquifer, and that they are aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity. Additional development of waste sites other than for inert waste has the potential to exacerbate this situation.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency require the site to be assessed in detail with regard to its impact on the junction between East Winch Road and the A47(T).
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: There is one potential noise receptor on the site but off site the nearest is 105m. Cumulative effect and creeping background must be considered as there is a large existing waste site on adjacent land. However the use is currently as a mineral extraction site and the proposed use may introduce other types of noise. Blackborough may be affected by haulage noise and should also be accounted for as should all of the above in a SEMP. Control needed over lighting, odour & nuisance, dust, and air quality. Development is more likely to have implications in terms of geodiversity, although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. The existing access roads to the site are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access requirements are needed for the site from the junction of the A47.
Parish/public concerns: Danger from lorry traffic; wildlife impact; effect on water table could lead to subsidence of property; pollution from smell, noise, dust, litter, light; risk of vermin and disease; effect on health and wellbeing; adverse impact on public rights of way; visitors would be deterred; impact on village and rural pace; conflicts with the waste hierarchy and proximity principle.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for deposit of inert waste only, subject to the satisfaction of the Environment Agency, to ecological considerations, and to highway requirements.

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 39 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 58)
ParishEast Winch
Location of siteWest Bilney Pit, Common Road, East Winch
Submitted byMr W George
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, landfill – inert waste only
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)8.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is off the west side of Common Road, East Bilney, in the parish of East Winch. It comprises a former quarry of varying depth which is now well vegetated.
Landscape: This site is in the countryside within a wider area of farmland and woodland, but is close to property and visible from concessionary paths. It is not considered suitable for semi-permanent waste uses. Landfilling would also cause the loss of existing vegetation. Inert fill could be used to bring the existing site up to the surrounding ground level but would cause the loss of scrub and trees.
Ecology: The site is currently well vegetated and a good wildlife habitat. Landfilling with inert waste could be permitted, provided that the site is checked for signs of any protected species such as bats, badgers and nesting birds, and that the work takes place outside of the bird nesting period. The site is not of any special ecological interest, and subject to consideration of protected species the developments proposed would be acceptable in principle.
Highways: The site is located off the C65 Common Road which is an HGV Access Route in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy, leading to the A47(T) at East Winch 1.7km to the north.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Potential for damage to water quality of East Winch Common SSSI and CWS 410 from silt and pollution arising from use as haul route by heavy goods vehicle traffic of minor public road C65 which runs alongside the SSSI and CWS for 0.7km.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is likely to lead to impact on accessible, extensive category sediments of the Lower Cretaceous Carstone forming a valuable inland exposure of this stratum. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: The site is above a major aquifer. Composting or anaerobic digestion would require the site to be covered with a sealed (bunded) impermeable surface to prevent any possibility of the contamination of controlled waters. The site would require the installation of appropriate sealed foul and surface water drainage systems. This location for use as a landfill will mean that the site will require a natural geological protection barrier against the escape / through-flow of polluting leachate into sensitive or protected groundwater supplies or controlled waters.
Highways Agency: The site would have a significant impact on the A47 junction with Common Road, East Winch, and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day. The Agency require assessment of the suitability of the junction.
Borough Council of King’s Lynn and West Norfolk: The site is 1km south of East Winch Common SSSI, designated for its heath fen and mire communities. Protected species will need consideration. Existing access roads to the site are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access requirements are needed for the site from the junction of the A47. Object on grounds of noise, lighting, odour and nuisance, effect on air quality. Conflicts with the waste hierarchy or the Regional Strategy as the over provision of void space does not support the proximity principle. There would be increased vehicle movements. The proximity of the site to landfill void space reduces longer haul for treatment residues. Construction wastes should be treated at the point of production and reused within the site before being removed from site for processing.
Parish/public concerns: Habitat should be left undisturbed; potential noise and dust pollution; more traffic on Common Road would generate noise, dust, danger and road damage; concern over aircraft safety (bird strike risk); potential odour, vermin and risk to health; quiet village will be industrialised; wildlife would be affected; landscape impact; would cause light pollution; sewer would need diversion; six houses on the windward side would be affected by dust, smells and gulls; loss of amenity for residents and walkers.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as preferred site for any of the uses proposed on landscape and amenity grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 89 (also submitted as mineral site MIN5)
ParishEast Winch
Location of siteLand off East Winch Road
Submitted byMiddleton Aggregates Limited
Proposed use/sRestoration of mineral working with inert waste
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)5.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site comprises gently sloping agricultural land forming part of the plateau above the River Nar. The site is bounded by farmland to the east and extensive areas of mineral and waste workings to the west and south.
Landscape: A planting shelter belt bounds the site to the north, and beyond that is further farmland. The nearest property lies approximately 200m to the north-east and this is situated at an oblique angle to the site. The property is screened by vegetation and would only be likely to get a filtered view of the edge of the area. A working would not be visible from the East Winch Road or other public viewpoints. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction, and inert waste recycling would be dependent on prior mineral extraction. The proposal is to restore the proposed mineral workings using imported material to near original ground levels, improving the site for biodiversity. Should the site be accepted for mineral extraction, restoration to original levels would be preferable.
Ecology: The site is in area of high wildlife value with many County Wildlife Sites nearby. This is opportunity not constraint and should guide restoration. There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed with an application.
Highways: The site is located on the C57 East Winch Road which is an HGV Access Route in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy. It is proposed that the site will use internal haul routes to the site access point for existing quarry adjacent to the site onto East Winch Road. The construction of East Winch Road needs to be improved if significant minerals and/or waste development is permitted in this area.
External Consultee Comments: External consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, the site was included as a proposed mineral extraction site MIN 5, in the ‘Issues and Options’ consultation in 2008 and the following external consultee responses received to the 2008 consultation are relevant to this proposal.
National Grid: - The site is crossed by National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines.
Highways Agency: - Several of the proposed mineral sites put forward are clustered around the A47 near to King's Lynn. Site MIN 5 has the first point of contact with the A47 Trunk Road Network at the junction with East Winch Road and an estimated 120 daily HGV (heavy goods vehicle) movements.
A broad overview as to the potential, worst-case cumulative daily traffic impacts at those trunk road junctions identified (if all mineral sites were to go ahead), is as follows. The A47 trunk road junction with the East Winch Road - affected by sites MIN05, MIN06, MIN17, MIN18, MIN29, MIN30, MIN31 and MIN59 is an at grade priority junction. These sites would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 1520 HGVs and less than one personal injury accidents per year over a 5 year period.
On the A47 minerals traffic may seek direct access to the trunk road at the priority junction at East Winch Road. Although this junction currently does not experience any significant capacity issues or number of Personal Injury Accidents, MIN 5 could increase the number of slow moving HGVs through this at-grade priority junction. It is recommended that assessments are carried out prior to identification of preferred locations for the above sites, and also if more than one site is proposed simultaneously. The above analysis suggests that if all, or some of the sites identified above are developed, there may be significant capacity and safety concerns at the East Winch priority junction with the A47.
Natural England: - The development is unlikely to have any adverse impact on the Blackborough End SSSI either alone or in combination with other sites. With regard to the River Nar SSSI, there is already an adverse impact due to run-off and silt from existing mineral workings and haul routes entering the river. There is potential for this adverse impact to increase as a result of this site allocation. There is a potential adverse impact from silt entering the River Nar SSSI from aggregates traffic using access tracks and minor public roads.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: - Noise, light, air quality, lighting and nuisance are of significant concern to the Borough Council and should be addressed in the submission of a Site Emission Management Plan
Public/parish council comments: concerns raised regarding the impact on landscape, ecology, highways, amenity and health from the proposed mineral extraction.
Conclusion: the site should not be considered further as a preferred site for waste disposal, given that the mineral site submitted under reference MIN5 is not considered acceptable.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 37
ParishFeltwell
Location of siteFeltwell Landfill Site, The Oakery, Lodge Road
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables (materials recycling facility), inert waste recycling, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)26.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; recycling/transfer 50,000
Background Information: Feltwell landfill site occupies a sand and gravel quarry permitted in 1954. Sand and gravel extraction continues on adjacent land.
Landscape: The site is within a wider area of forestry and agricultural land which lies within the Brecks. The site is generally well concealed from the wider landscape although it can be glimpsed from Warren Road, an unmade track which passes its western boundary. The developments proposed would have low additional landscape impact alongside landfill operations, but with the exception of composting, long term operations, with associated buildings and structures, would not be appropriate in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site is adjacent to part of the Breckland Forest SSSI and Breckland SPA. The proposals are potentially acceptable with additional information or modification. New development would have to demonstrate that it would not cause disturbance to habitats or result in aerial nutrient deposition.
Highways: The site is accessed via the U21389 Warren Road, which is classed as a Soft Road in Norfolk’s Route Hierarchy. It is approx 650m south from the existing quarry access to the B1112 Lodge Road, a Main Distributor in the Route Hierarchy. Warren Road is not suitable for an intensified use, and significant improvements would be needed to bring the required section to an appropriate standard for adoption.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: This site is above Source Protection Zone 2 a Major Aquifer and would be above former landfill site. Due to the sensitivity of the underlying geology the proposed scheme would require the site to be covered with a sealed impermeable surface to prevent leachate from waste from entering the underlying Source Protection Zone (major aquifer for public water supply). In addition, the site would require the installation of appropriate sealed foul and surface water drainage systems.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: There may be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. Access to the site is unsuitable for waste vehicles and further developments should not take place unless adequate safe access roads can be developed. The siting of substantial waste infrastructure in this location does not support the proximity principle although the treatment processes do support the waste hierarchy. Nearest house is 450m to south-east, at Feltwell Lodge. In relation to this site there would not be relevant exposure to PM10 'near' to the potential sources of emission. As a result this site is not of concern from an Air Quality Management perspective in respect of PM10. Any potential health risks arising from bio-aerosol emissions would need to be addressed in licensing and permitting of a waste operation. Noted that there have been previous odour complaints related to composting and landfill activities on this site. Composting could have a significant impact on receptors and an odour management plan would be advisable as part of a SEMP.
Breckland District Council: The site is adjacent to the Breckland SPA and development of this site would have a significant detrimental impact to the habitat of the protected species. Object to all proposed uses except composting which could fit into the rural nature of the site is likely to have less of an impact on the SPA.
Parish/public concerns: Visual impact; poor screening; composting leads to smell, noise and bio-aerosol emissions; impact would be worse on a higher site; nuisance from litter and vermin; landfill is not sustainable; adverse impact on leisure and tourism (effect on walkers on Warren Road and users of touring caravan site; loss of woodland; threat to wildlife; site is next to a SSSI.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for the developments proposed (for the life of the landfill only), subject to the satisfaction of the Environment Agency, to ecological requirements, and to highway improvements.

Site Reference No. View Comments (8) View Map WAS 5
ParishKing’s Lynn
Location of siteKL Technologies Ltd, Estuary Road, King’s Lynn
Submitted byCyclerval UK
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, thermal treatment
Acceptable use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, thermal treatment and other forms of residual waste treatment.
Size of site (hectares)3.6
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.150,000
Background Information: The site is an area of grassland close to the east bank of River Great Ouse and at the northern margin of the industrial area north of King’s Lynn docks.
Landscape: Thermal treatment in particular may demand large structures, and consideration would need to be given to an appropriate scale of development, which has regard to landscape. In addition, space should be reserved within the site for a landscape buffer area with the open countryside beyond.
Ecology: There are no natural environment designations on the site, or nearby. However, the long grass comprises a potential habitat for ground nesting birds such as skylark. Survey for presence of nesting birds would be required prior to any work on the site.
Highways: This site would be accessed via the U20221 Estuary Road which links to a principal route, A1078 Edward Benefer Way, at a signalised junction.
External Consultee Comments:
Internal Drainage Board: The northern boundary of this site is adjacent to North Lynn Drain, which is a Board-maintained watercourse. Proposals to utilise this land as a waste site may therefore be impacted upon by this drain and the Board's Bylaws. As it is a site in a flood plain near the River Ouse there is a chance of flooding.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: No impact on international or national sites of nature conservation. There are two CWSs in the area and there may be protected or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. Existing access to the site is unsuitable for waste vehicles with access via residential areas and a route to a school and development should not take place unless adequate safe access roads can be developed. Siting of substantial waste infrastructure in this location does not support the proximity principle unless waste is sourced locally from the docks and neighbouring industrial complex although the treatment processes do support the waste hierarchy. Note control would be needed of noise, air quality, lighting and odour.
Public concerns: Smell, noise, dust, poor highway access, greenhouse gas from thermal treatment, ash residue needs disposal, there is capacity at Blackborough End.
Conclusion: The site should be considered as a preferred site for the categories of development put forward.

Site Reference No. View Comments (9) View Map WAS 51
ParishKing’s Lynn
Location of sitePoplar Avenue, Saddlebow, King’s Lynn
Submitted bySingh UK
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above, and other forms of residual waste treatment.
Size of site (hectares)1.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 25,000; HWRC 5,000; EFW/other 150,000
Background Information: The site is unused land on an allocated industrial area at the southern end of the Saddlebow industrial area, west of Saddlebow Road, south of the A47 King’s Lynn bypass. The site is within The Willows Business Park.
Landscape: Neighbouring industrial development detracts from the rural appearance of the landscape. The proposed uses of composting, anaerobic digestion and the processing of mixed waste and recyclables would have relatively low landscape impact. Thermal treatment would require a larger building and chimney but this would be in scale with the power station to the west. 
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed in a planning application.
Highways: The site is located on the unadopted 2P342 Poplar Avenue. It is approx 500m from the site to the C8 High (Saddlebow) Road which is a Main Distributor (northward, towards the A47) in the Route Hierarchy. The site is well located in relation to the highway network, but there is a need to consider the overall spatial distribution of HWRCs.
External Consultee Comments:
National Grid plc: The site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines, adjacent to National Grid's Walpole 400kV substation and within the vicinity of overhead power lines. Developers and planning authorities are advised to take into account the location and nature of existing electricity transmission equipment when planning a development.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency has expressed concerns about the operation of the A47(T) Saddlebow Interchange, particularly during the peak hours, because of congestion. The Agency require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47(T).
District/Borough Council: Access to the site is good for waste vehicles. The large number of proposed processes could produce a significant increase in noise and the effect on business and recreational ground on the neighbouring land must also be considered as well as residential receptors. Haulage effect must be considered particularly for the Caravan Park and South Lynn. If permission were granted extreme mitigation may be necessary. The proposed development site has the potential to have adverse impacts on the King's Lynn Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) which is situated approximately 1 mile to the north east of the site. Air Quality Assessment would be required as part of development proposals. Potential health risks arising from bio-aerosol emissions would need to be addressed. Cumulative effect of lighting must be considered. Odour would require strict controls. The site supports the waste hierarchy and the proximity principle for waste treatment and has potential to support higher levels of recovery from waste due to the potential users of steam and hot water on neighbouring sites.
Parish/public concerns: Objections to thermal treatment on grounds of relatively high climate change external cost impacts, lack of monitoring of fine particles, and need for specialist toxic disposal of fly ash. Additional traffic, noise and visual pollution would have a very negative impact on the whole community, and the long term effect of the pollution and restricted rights of way would have a detrimental impact for many generations to come.
Conclusion: Subject to assessment as required by the Highways Agency, the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed and other forms of residual waste treatment.

Site Reference No. View Comments (11) View Map WAS 65
ParishKing's Lynn
Location of siteWillows Business Park, King’s Lynn
Submitted byNorfolk County Council
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, thermal treatment, pyrolysis and gasification, autoclaving
Acceptable use/sAs above and other forms of residual waste treatment.
Size of site (hectares)5.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; recycling/processing 50,000; A/D, thermal treatment and other 150,000
Background Information: The site is unused land on an allocated industrial area at the southern end of the Saddlebow industrial area, west of Saddlebow Road, south of the A47 King’s Lynn bypass. The site is within The Willows Business Park, and is divided by Poplar Road, which is an industrial estate accessed off Saddlebow Road. The site is adjacent to the King’s Lynn HWRC.
Landscape: The existing industrial development detracts from the rural appearance of the landscape. The proposed uses of composting, anaerobic digestion and the processing of mixed waste and recyclables could be accommodated on the area with relatively low landscape impact. Thermal treatment would require a larger building and chimney but this would be in scale with the power station to the west, and other industrial development to the north.
Ecology: There are no outstanding ecology issues that could not be addressed in a planning application.
Highways: The site is located on the un-adopted 2P342 Poplar Avenue. It is approx 200m from the site to the C8 High (Saddlebow) Road which is a Main Distributor (northward, towards the A47) in the Route Hierarchy. The site is well located in relation to the highway network.
External Consultee Comments:
Highways Agency: Have expressed concerns about the operation of the A47(T) Saddlebow Interchange, particularly during the peak hours, because of congestion. The Highways Agency require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47(T).
National Grid plc: The site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines, adjacent to National Grid's Walpole 400kV substation and within the vicinity of overhead power lines. Developers and planning authorities are advised to take into account the location and nature of existing electricity transmission equipment when planning a development.
Borough Council of King’s Lynn and West Norfolk: Access to the site is good for waste vehicles. There are 2 local CWSs in the area and therefore there may be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. The proposed development site has the potential to have adverse impacts on the King's Lynn Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) which is situated approximately 1 mile to the north east of the site. Air Quality Assessment would be required as part of development proposals. Potential health risks arising from bio-aerosol emissions would need to be addressed. The site supports the waste hierarchy and the proximity principle for waste treatment and has potential to support higher levels of recovery from waste due to the potential users of steam and hot water on neighbouring sites. The recovery operations may produce these as a by-product.
Parish/public concerns: Objections to thermal treatment on grounds of relatively high climate change external cost impacts, lack of monitoring of fine particles, and need for specialist toxic disposal of fly ash.
Conclusion: Subject to assessment as required by the Highways Agency, the site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed, and for other forms of residual waste treatment.

Site Reference No. View Comments (7) View Map WAS 25 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 6)
ParishMiddleton
Location of siteLand off East Winch Road / Mill Drove, Middleton
Submitted byMiddleton Aggregates Limited
Proposed use/sNon-hazardous landfill
Acceptable use/sInert landfill
Size of site (hectares)10.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.40,000
Background Information: The site is an agricultural field which abuts the south side of East Winch Road and the east side of Mill Drove. An extensive area of mineral working, parts with non-hazardous and inert waste infill, lies to the south, east and south-west. Blackborough End village is approximately 600m to the south-west, and an equestrian centre and dwelling are sited to the north-east. The site has also been put forward for consideration as a preferred site for mineral extraction (carstone); MIN6.
Landscape: The site is within an Area of High Landscape Quality in the Borough Local Plan. However, the site is not open to views from outside, being screened by a dense tree belt, and if the site is to be accepted as appropriate for mineral extraction, some import and infilling with inert waste could aid the subsequent restoration of the site. On that basis the proposal would be acceptable in landscape terms.
Ecology: There are no special ecological considerations to be taken into account. Surveys would be needed for nesting birds, and barn owls and bats. Restoration to acid grassland, heathland type habitat or return to arable would be appropriate.
Highways: Access to the adjacent mineral workings is off the C57A East Winch Road, at a point east of the site. Subject to use of this access, and to routing of HGVs between it and the A47(T) as per existing arrangements, the Highway Authority would raise no objection, subject to developer contributions towards the funding of a programmed haunching scheme for East Winch Road.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Site close to the Nar SSSI floodplain. Important to show no adverse impacts. Note potential for restoration in line with Norfolk Ecological Network and with restoration that may take place on associated minerals sites to provide a network of habitats. All of these factors should be taken into account.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: Likely to lead to impact on extensive category Pleistocene [Anglian] glacial till and glacio-fluvial gravel deposits, including two till faces with high research potential. Landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. Would have impact on assets significant at regional or county levels.
Environment Agency: The site is above a major aquifer. The Agency objects to waste other than inert. Note sensitivity of the surrounding area. This site is within close proximity to the Blackborough geological SSSI and also the River Nar. Are aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Additional development of waste sites has the potential to exacerbate this situation. The placing in-situ of Hazardous and Non Hazardous waste at this location would be contrary to internal Environment Agency guidance RGN3, which stipulates Inert Wastes only is to be deposited in ecologically sensitive areas. This guidance is based upon the EU Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC).
National Grid plc: The site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines
Highways Agency: Given the proximity to the A47(T), the Highways Agency would require assessment of the potential impact on the Trunk Road at its junction with East Winch Road.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Receptors sensitive to noise within 305m. Cumulative effect and creeping background must be considered as there are existing processes and potential allocation sites on adjacent land. Impact of haulage must also be considered. Conditions would be needed to protect amenity. Existing access roads unsuitable for safe use of waste vehicles. Improved access needed for the site from the junction of the A47. Over-development of the void space proposed in the number of site allocations in this area do not support the waste hierarchy or the Regional Strategy as the over-provision of void space does not support the proximity principle. Site 600m from Blackborough End SSSI, designated for its geological interest.
Parish/public concerns: Impact on residential amenity, wildlife, and local roads.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for inert waste disposal, subject to prior mineral extraction, and to assessment as required by the Highways Agency.

Site Reference No. View Comments (7) View Map WAS 36
ParishMiddleton
Location of siteBlackborough End landfill site, Mill Drove, Middleton
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, Processing of recyclables (materials recycling facility), inert waste recycling thermal treatment, landfill of hazardous waste, waste transfer, mechanical biological treatment
Acceptable use/sAs above and other forms of residual waste treatment
Size of site (hectares)55.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; recycling/transfer 100,000; MBT/thermal treatment 150,000; landfill 100,000.
Background Information: The site, in the parishes of Middleton and East Winch, is an extensive area of landfill which adjoins active and former sand, gravel and carstone workings. Parts of the landfill site have been completed and restored.
Landscape: The site lies within a wider area of farmland and woodland, elevated above the valley of the River Nar, to the south. The existing site does not intrude into a wide visual envelope although it is visible from parts of Wormegay Road, Mill Drove and from a number of public rights of way and concessionary paths within the area. The addition of uses such as composting, inert waste recycling and landfill for the period of the current consent is unlikely to add significant detriment to the current landscape uses, and would raise no outstanding landscape issues that could not be addressed in an application. Thermal Treatment and Mechanical Biological Treatment would however require larger and permanent structures; this could be potentially a preferred option in landscape terms with additional information or modification.
Ecology: The existing landfill site is of limited ecological significance, although restoration of landfill areas to heathland/acid grassland has the potential to greatly increase the ecological value of the site, and help attain biodiversity targets. Building for the other processes proposed would require ecological survey, and would not have potential for biodiversity benefit.
Highways: The site is accessed from the C822 Mill Drove which is an HGV Access Route in the Highway Authority’s Route Hierarchy. This leads via East Winch Road to the A47(T). The site is acceptable in highway terms subject to existing routing arrangements being followed. A vehicle weight restriction protects Blackborough End village from HGV traffic. East Winch Road would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concerned about impacts on the Nar SSSI and it is important to show no adverse impacts, However, there is also potential for restoration in line with Norfolk Ecological Network and in line with restoration that may take place on associated minerals sites (that are subject to a separate consultation), to provide a network of habitats.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site was once significant for research into its extensive category sediments of the Lower Cretaceous Sandringham Formation Leziate Beds and Carstone. Because of landscaping it has substantially lost its geodiversity interest. The proposed landfill is unlikely to affect access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: The site is above a major aquifer. Object to the allocation of this site due to the sensitivity of the surrounding area. This site is within close proximity to the Blackborough geological SSSI and also the River Nar. The Agency is aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity.
Highways Agency: Site would have significant impact on the A47 junction with Common Road, East Winch and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day. Assessment of the impact on the junction would be needed.
National Grid plc: The site is located within the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: The existing roads to the site are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access requirements are needed for the site from the junction of the A47. Likely to have implications more in terms of geodiversity although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. There are 5 CWSs in Middleton which could be affected, although due to the nature of the sites and their history the area has had a high level of disturbance. Pierpoint Drain Fen Ref 411, Old Hall Farm Ref 412, Conduit Plantation Ref 413, Middleton Common Ref 433 and Blackborough Pit Ref 434. Over development of the void space proposed in the number of site allocations in this area do not support the waste hierarchy or the Regional Strategy as the over provision of void space does not support the proximity principle.
Parish/public concerns: Objections to thermal treatment on grounds of relatively high climate change external cost impacts, lack of monitoring of fine particles, and need for specialist toxic disposal of fly ash. Objection to hazardous waste; proximity to the River Nar Valley. Concerns about pollution, and impacts on amenity and wildlife from dust, noise and lighting. Impacts of HGV traffic.
Conclusion: the site should be considered further as being potentially acceptable as a preferred site for the developments proposed and for other forms of residual waste treatment, subject to landscape constraints, assessment by the Highways Agency, and the satisfaction of the Environment Agency.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 40
ParishMiddleton
Location of site“Big Pit? off Mill Drove, Blackborough End
Submitted byMr W George
Proposedluse/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, landfill (non-hazardous waste only)
Acceptable use/sInert landfill and inert waste recycling
Size of site (hectares)19.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Recycling 50,000; inert fill 50,000
Background Information: The site has been an active mineral working for over 60 years. Some of the worked areas have been subject to infilling with inert and putrescible wastes. The site lies within a complex of mineral and waste sites east of the village of Blackborough End.
Landscape: Restoration has been piecemeal and slow, although there is now an approved scheme. In that context inert landfill could assist with restoration, but any permanent development would compromise this and are less likely to be acceptable in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site itself is not of any special ecological interest, and subject to consideration of protected species the developments proposed would be acceptable in principle. Restoration to heathland habitat or acid grassland would greatly increase the biodiversity value of the site.
Highways: Access to the site is via a short length of Foster’s End Lane and then the C822 Mill Drove, an HGV Access Route. This leads northwards to East Winch Road, which would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted. A haunching scheme has been proposed for East Winch Road. The Highway Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Many of these sites are close to the Nar SSSI floodplain or floodplains of associated watercourses. We are concerned about impacts on the Nar SSSI and it is important to show no adverse impacts, However, there is also potential for restoration in line with Norfolk Ecological Network and in line with restoration that may take place on associated minerals sites (that are subject to a separate consultation), to provide a network of habitats. In our view, all of these factors should be taken into account when deciding the suitability of these allocations.
English Heritage: We have significant concerns and objections with regards to the detrimental impact of waste facilities on the setting of scheduled remains of Blackborough Priory (which are also separately listed as Grade II structure). Although existing mineral sites would be used for waste purposes, the visual impact of new structures and restored landscape could greatly harm the setting of the priory.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is adjacent to Blackborough End geological SSSI designated for its exposures in the Sandringham Formation and Carstone. It will lead to impact on researched extensive category sediments of the Sandringham Formation Leziate Beds and their relationship to finite Pleistocene channel-fill sediments exhibited at this site. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency object to the allocation of this site due to the sensitivity of the surrounding area. They note that the site is above a Major Aquifer. This site is within close proximity to the Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI and also the River Nar. The Agency is aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity of the proposed sites, and comment that additional development of waste sites has the potential to exacerbate this situation.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47.
Borough Council of King’s Lynn and West Norfolk: Concerns expressed relating to noise, dust, lighting, odour, air quality, and increased vehicle movements. Potential health risks arising from bio-aerosol emissions would need to be addressed in licensing and permitting of a waste operation. Likely to have implications more in terms of geodiversity although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. There are 5 CWSs in Middleton which could be affected. Over-development of the void space proposed in this area would not support the waste hierarchy or Regional Strategy. Over-provision of space and treatment facilities would not support the proximity principle. Existing access roads are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access needed from the junction of the A47.
Parish/public concerns: Objection to thermal treatment on grounds of greenhouse gas and fine particle emissions, and need to dispose of fly-ash; adverse impacts on amenity, wildlife, and local roads.
Conclusion: the site should be considered further as preferred site only for inert landfill and inert waste recycling, where this can be demonstrated to be beneficial to restoration.

Site Reference No. View Comments (7) View Map WAS 41 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 59)
ParishMiddleton
Location of siteCarstone Pit, Mill Drove, Blackborough End
Submitted byMr W George
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, landfill – non-hazardous waste only
Acceptable use/sTemporary composting, inert landfill and inert waste recycling
Size of site (hectares)7.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; recycling 50,000; inert fill 50,000
Background Information: The site is a former carstone quarry off the west side of Mill Drove, approximately 300m east of Blackborough End village. Permission was first granted in 1971, and the site was restored with steep sides and a flat quarry floor. A further permission, for the extraction of sand from the floor of the quarry, was granted until September 2010.
Landscape: In landscape terms this is a rural site, but is not widely visible. Composting and inert landfill would have a relatively low impact. The other developments proposed would require the erection of new buildings/structures in the countryside, but would not be widely visible in the landscape.
Ecology: The site itself is not of any special ecological interest, and subject to consideration of protected species the developments proposed would be acceptable in principle. Restoration to heathland habitat or dry acid grassland would increase the biodiversity value of the site.
Highways: Access to the site is off the C822 Mill Drove, an HGV Access Route. This leads northwards to East Winch Road, which would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted. A haunching scheme has been proposed for East Winch Road, and the Highways Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Many of these sites are close to the Nar SSSI floodplain or floodplains of associated watercourses. We are concerned about impacts on the Nar SSSI and it is important to show no adverse impacts, However, there is also potential for restoration in line with Norfolk Ecological Network and in line with restoration that may take place on associated minerals sites (that are subject to a separate consultation), to provide a network of habitats. In our view, all of these factors should be taken into account when deciding the suitability of these allocations.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site was once significant for its relationship to the Blackborough End geological SSSI designated for its exposures of extensive category sediments of the Lower Cretaceous Sandringham Formation and Carstone. Because of landscaping this pit has substantially lost its geodiversity interest. The proposed landfill is unlikely to affect access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency object to the allocation of this site due to the sensitivity of the surrounding area. They note that the site is above a Major Aquifer. This site is within close proximity to the Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI and also the River Nar. The Agency is aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity, and comment that additional development of waste sites has the potential to exacerbate this situation.
Highways Agency: The Highways Agency require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Cumulative effect must be considered, with existing and potential sites. Large number of processes proposed may require significant mitigation. Boundary runs close to residential property. Local impact of haulage, dust, odour, bio-aerosol emissions to air and cumulative effect of lighting must be considered. Likely to have implications more in terms of geodiversity although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. There are 5 CWSs in Middleton which could be affected. Over-development of the void space and treatment facilities in this area would not support the waste hierarchy, proximity principle or Regional Strategy. Existing access roads are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access needed from the junction of the A47.
Parish/public concerns: Objection to thermal treatment on grounds of greenhouse gas and fine particle emissions, health risk; and need to dispose of fly-ash; concern that the already extensive waste operations within Blackborough End would extend further into the countryside; there would be adverse impacts on amenity, wildlife, and local roads.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site only for temporary uses comprising composting, inert landfill and inert waste recycling to avoid prejudicing restoration of the existing mineral site.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 42
ParishMiddleton
Location of siteCarstone Pit, Mill Drove, Blackborough End
Submitted byMr W George
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, landfill – non-hazardous waste only
Acceptable use/sTemporary composting, inert landfill and inert waste recycling
Size of site (hectares)6.3
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 40,000; inert fill 50,000
Background Information: The site is an active carstone working adjacent to the west side of Mill Drove, approximately 300m north-east of Blackborough End village. Permission for mineral extraction was granted in 1997, until October 2012, subject to progressive working and restoration to a lower level.
Landscape: The site is in a rural setting, but is not widely visible. Temporary uses such as composting and inert landfill, which would have a relatively low impact, may be acceptable on this rural site. Other developments proposed would require the erection of new buildings/structures, and whilst they would not be widely visible in the landscape, permanent facilities in this location would not be appropriate.
Ecology: The site itself is not of any special ecological interest, and subject to consideration of protected species the developments proposed would be acceptable in principle. Restoration to heathland habitat or Lowland Acid grassland would increase the biodiversity value of the site. The site lies to north of a quarry containing Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI.
Highways: Access to the site is off the C822 Mill Drove, an HGV Access Route. This leads northwards to East Winch Road, which would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted. A haunching scheme has been proposed for East Winch Road, and the Highways Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Many of these sites are close to the Nar SSSI floodplain or floodplains of associated watercourses. We are concerned about impacts on the Nar SSSI and it is important to show no adverse impacts, However, there is also potential for restoration in line with Norfolk Ecological Network and in line with restoration that may take place on associated minerals sites (that are subject to a separate consultation), to provide a network of habitats. In our view, all of these factors should be taken into account when deciding the suitability of these allocations.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is in a pit adjacent to Blackborough End geological SSSI designated for its exposures in the Lower Cretaceous Sandringham Formation and Carstone. It is developed in extensive category Carstone deposits, and will lead to impact on these extensive category sediments and on those of late Devensian covers and researched at this site. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: Object to the allocation of this site due to the sensitivity of the surrounding area. They note that the site is above a Major Aquifer. This site is within close proximity to the Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI and also the River Nar. The Agency is aware of groundwater pollution issues as a result of former and existing processes in the vicinity, and comment that additional development of waste sites has the potential to exacerbate this situation.
National Grid plc: the site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines.
Highways Agency: The site would have a significant impact on the A47 junction with Common Road, East Winch and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Cumulative effect must be considered, with existing and potential sites. Large number of processes proposed may require significant mitigation. Boundary runs close to residential property. Local impact of haulage, dust, odour, bio-aerosol emissions to air and cumulative effect of lighting must be considered. Likely to have implications more in terms of geodiversity although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. There are 5 CWSs in Middleton which could be affected. Over-development of the void space and treatment facilities in this area would not support the waste hierarchy, proximity principle or Regional Strategy. Existing access roads are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access needed from the junction of the A47.
Parish/public concerns: Objection to thermal treatment on grounds of greenhouse gas and fine particle emissions, health risk; and need to dispose of fly-ash; concern that the already extensive waste operations within Blackborough End would extend further into the countryside.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site only for temporary uses comprising composting, and inert landfill on landscape grounds and to avoid prejudicing restoration of the existing mineral site.

Site Reference No. View Comments (2) View Map WAS 43
ParishMiddleton
Location of siteWhite Sand Pit, Corner of Mill Drove/ Wormegay Road, Blackborough End
Submitted byMr W George
Proposed use/sComposting
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)1.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is on the eastern side of the southern end of Mill Drove, and is adjacent to Blackborough End Pit geological SSSI. The site lies within an extensive area of minerals and waste development. It comprises a former sand quarry, now well vegetated by scrub, 200m south-east of the main part of Blackborough End village.
Landscape: Use of the site would require a new access into the area and may open up views of the site from the wider landscape. It would cause the loss of vegetation on this “naturally restored? site, and would not be appropriate in landscape terms.
Ecology:tThe site is a restored quarry and its ecological value is improving through natural succession. Through management of the existing site, a heathland type habitat could be achieved that will add to biodiversity targets. Disturbing the site to accommodate composting would not be appropriate in ecological terms.
Highways: Access to the former quarry was originally from the south, off Wormegay Road. The C822 Mill Drove, an HGV Access Route, lies to the east. This leads northwards to East Winch Road, which would need to be improved if significant minerals or waste development is permitted. A haunching scheme has been proposed for East Winch Road, and the Highways Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites. The Highways Agency require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47.
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Concerned about impacts on the Nar SSSI. Note potential for restoration in association with other sites to provide a network of habitats.
English Heritage: English Heritage are concerned about detrimental impact of development on the setting of the scheduled remains of Blackborough Priory (also listed as a GradeII structure).
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site was once significant for its exposures of extensive category Pleistocene sands and gravels, and for its relationship to Blackborough End geological SSSI designated for its exposures in the Lower Cretaceous Sandringham Formation and Carstone. Because of vegetation and slumping of sections it has substantially lost its geodiversity interest. The proposed landfill is unlikely to affect access to sections for scientific study.
Environment Agency: Would require the site to be covered with a sealed (bunded) impermeable surface to prevent any possibility of the contamination of controlled waters.
Highways Agency: Further assessment of the site would be needed in relation to the suitability of the junction of east Winch Road with the A47.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: Cumulative effect must be considered, with existing and potential sites. Large number of processes proposed may require significant mitigation. Boundary runs close to residential property. Local impact of haulage, dust, odour, bio-aerosol emissions to air and cumulative effect of lighting must be considered. Likely to have implications more in terms of geodiversity although there could be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats present. There are 5 CWSs in Middleton which could be affected. Over-development of the void space and treatment facilities in this area would not support the waste hierarchy, proximity principle or Regional Strategy. Existing access roads are unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access needed from the junction of the A47.
Parish/public concerns: There would be adverse impacts on amenity, wildlife, and local roads.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as preferred site, for landscape, ecology and amenity reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (14) View Map WAS 56 (also submitted as mineral site MIN33)
ParishWest Dereham
Location of siteLand at Grange Farm, Main Road, Crimplesham
Submitted byFrimstone Ltd
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, landfill of inert waste
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)9.0
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site lies to the south-west of the A134, east of the village of Crimplesham. To the north-west, the site adjoins an area subject to a planning permission issued in May 2009 for a replacement sand and gravel quarry, with restoration by inert waste infill. The site has been reduced in size, as it originally included the larger area now subject to planning permission.
Landscape: The surrounding landscape is very open and the site is visible from parts of West Dereham village, and from Main Road, the A134, Brick Kiln Lane and Bath Road. Part of the site is visible from a public right of way, Crimplesham FP2, to the south-west. Inert waste input would be dependent on mineral extraction taking place on this site first. Inert waste imports may help to achieve a suitable restoration.
Ecology: Infilling or partial infill as an element of restoration of a mineral working could lead to enhancement of the biodiversity value over that of the existing farmland.
Highways: The site is adjacent to the A134 Lynn Road, which is a Principal Route. It is well located in relation to the route hierarchy, but it is unlikely that a direct access onto the A134 would be permitted. Alternatives are via the C34 Lime Kiln Lane (a Local Access Route) or the C543 Main Road (which has no designation in Norfolk’s route hierarchy). The recently approved extraction and fill on an adjacent site will have access off Main Road, as has the existing quarry to the north. Further investigation of the local highway network would be required to determine the location of a safe access point to this site.
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: WAS12 (Crimplesham Quarry) and WAS56 & WAS57 (Land at Grange Farm). There are a number of important historic features around these three sites, including the Grade II* St Mary's Church to the west in Crimplesham, the Grade I listed St Andrew's Church to the south in West Dereham and the scheduled monastic grange and moat to the east at Grange Farm. The setting of these features would be negatively affected by the proposed minerals and waste site allocations, exacerbated cumulatively if all three sites are utilised. There is also significant archaeological potential at the junction between Lynn Road and Lime Kiln Road, with an identified area of Romano-British occupation. Further research and analysis would be needed to assess the impact on the above features.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is likely to be developed in extensive category Cretaceous Gault and Chalk bedrock and Pleistocene boulder clay and gravels. The nearby Anzac gravel quarry has yielded finite category Palaeolithic evidence. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: express concerns over noise, dust, cumulative effect with other sites; note that there are 2 local CWSs and therefore there may be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. The proposal forms part of a complex of proposals in this area which would create an intensification of activity along the A134. The access to the site should be improved to provide a direct connection to the A134 to avoid use of unsuitable roads where this is can not be achieved the route is not suitable for waste vehicles. Should be evidence to support the proximity principle for waste management. Recycling of inert construction waste is supported strategically and by the waste hierarchy above disposal. Construction wastes should be treated at the point of production and re-used within the site before being removed from site for processing.
Parish/public concerns: Landscape impact; impact on rural character; view of the Grade1 listed church, St Andrew's, which is a landmark visible from Crimplesham, and a long length of the A134 would be considerably marred; visible from housing; effect on setting of West Dereham; village landscape already suffers from the creeping expansion of the sugar beet factory at Wissington and the recycling business at Glazewing; woodland would be lost; impact on wildlife; West Dereham is a village steeped in history; people will be affected by odour, dust, noise and litter; noise, dust and danger from lorries; light pollution; contamination to ground water; roads not suitable; landfill could include asbestos waste; health risk, particularly to those suffering from asthma; effect on property value; water pollution.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 44
ParishWormegay
Location of sitePark Farm, Wormegay
Submitted byMr W George, Delta Roadstone Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)19.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site comprises an area of disturbed landscape on the south side of the River Nar. The area adjacent to the river has been worked for minerals and restored to a series of wet pools. The area to the south is part former parkland and part arable and has permission for mineral workings. Part of this land has been excavated.
Landscape: The northern edge of the site is visible from footpath Wormegay FP11, on the north side of the Nar, although otherwise the site is largely screened from view. The site is in the countryside, and a permanent waste use, involving new structures would detract from the rural appearance of the site. A temporary use such as composting may be acceptable for the duration of the existing mineral working provided it did not delay restoration or cause the loss of the woodland fringe of vegetation along the River Nar.
Ecology: The site is adjacent to the River Nar SSSI, which follows the river. The site could be acceptable, subject additional information or modification and mitigation and assessment of impact on the SSSI.
Highways: The local highway network is poor. The site is located off the C55 New Road which has no designation in Norfolk’s route hierarchy. It is approximately 1.6km via High Bridge to the C822 Mill Drove, which is an HGV Access Route leading to the East Winch Road and the A47(T) at Middleton. A haunching scheme has been proposed for East Winch Road, and the Highway Authority would seek contributions towards the funding of this from developers of significant new minerals and waste sites. It is unlikely that High Bridge is suitable for the size of vehicle that will be transporting material to / from the site. It is not satisfactory to access the site from the south as it would involve passing through the village of Wormegay before joining the A134. Use of the site as proposed would not be suitable in transport terms.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England: Note potential adverse impacts on the River Nar SSSI if there are pathways for pollutants to enter the river. The allocation is adjacent to land used as a flood storage area.
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Express concern about impacts on the Nar SSSI and its floodplain.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is partially within Flood Zone 3, and that a Flood Risk Assessment would be required with an application.
Highways Agency: Would require further assessment of the site in relation to the suitability of the junction with the A47.
King’s Lynn and West Norfolk Borough Council: There are 4 local CWSs and therefore there may be protected species or BAP Species or Habitats in the wider area. The location of this site within a protected river valley raises serious concerns over its suitability for use and part of the site is within the flood plain. The potential risks to the environment of the river are extremely high in the event of site drainage failure. Run off from site drainage for Anaerobic Digestion and Composting have an extremely high biological oxygen demand and high suspended solids levels. Escape in to the river from this site would have an extremely damaging effect of wildlife. The existing access is unsuitable for the safe use of waste vehicles. New and improved access requirements are needed from the junction of the A47. Treatment of separately collected waste fractions would increase vehicle movements. Concern at impact of lighting, odour and nuisance, noise, and air quality. Question as to compliance with the proximity principle.
Parish/public concerns: Potential for noise and vermin, pollution of the River Nar, and impact on a rural area.
Conclusion: The site should be not considered further as preferred site for the uses proposes, for highways and landscape reasons.

View Comments (1) 7.7 North Norfolk Waste Allocation Sites

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 16
ParishEdgefield
Location of siteEdgefield Landfill Site, Norwich Road
Submitted byNorfolk Environmental Waste Services Limited
Proposed use/sComposting, anaerobic digestion, landfill (non-hazardous, in Pound Plantation area), waste transfer, HWRC, mixed waste processing, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment, pyrolysis, gasification, and energy from waste.
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)10.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is an active landfill, which has operated for more than 30 years under temporary planning permissions. The current permission runs until 2013. 
Landscape: The site lies within the Glaven Valley Conservation Area. The active landfill site is incompatible with its setting in this sensitive area of countryside, But represents a temporary use, pending completion of restoration. The site would not be acceptable in landscape terms for any permanent waste development.
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological significance, but its wider surroundings include Holt Lowes SSSI 1km to the north, and Edgefield Woods County Wildlife Site 500m to the north. Further supporting information and mitigation would be required in connection with some of the proposed uses.
Highways: Access to the site is off the west side of the B1149, a Main Distributor Route. Continued use of this access would be acceptable for the uses proposed.
External Consultee Comments:
Natural England:  Low potential risk to Holt Lowes SSSI which is a composite site of the Norfolk Valley Fens SAC. Potential adverse impact if there are pathways for pollutants to enter the River Glaven.
Norfolk Coast Partnership:  Although in this location I would not expect any direct impacts on the landscape of the Norfolk Coast AONB, it is close to the River Glaven, which then flows through the AONB on its way to the sea at Cley. The quality of the rivers flowing through the AONB is an important aspect of its natural beauty, so I would wish to be assured that all possible precautions were taken to avoid pollution of the river through run-off or seepage from the site.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site may lead to impact on Pleistocene glacio-fluvial outwash gravels. The proposed landfill in the Pound Plantation part of the site may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
English Heritage: Site is within the Glaven Valley Conservation Area, designated largely for its historic landscape character. Use of this site is likely to have a considerable impact on the special character and appearance of this conservation area. The eventual restoration of the site following the end of landfill operations will need to be carefully handled to avoid harm to the landscape. Further assessment is required to assess the impact.
Environment Agency: Assume site will require active long term site management. Site overlays a major aquifer. Development over a major aquifer may be suitable where there is a substantial, natural low permeability geological barrier to prevent long term pollution. Likely that there are no substantial geological barriers. Object on ecological grounds.
North Norfolk District Council: No objection to the continuation of the use as a landfill site at this stage. The site is within the 'Randomly Enclosed Rolling Open Farmland' landscape type. It should be noted that the 2005 LCA is draft and a revised version incorporating further work on consistency of landscape types between districts is being prepared.
Parish/public concerns:  Impact on landscape and flora and fauna; noise, dust, smell and litter; extra vehicles on narrow local roads would pose a safety risk; the footpaths along the A148 are also far from ideal and this will add further danger; roads prone to floods when water runs off the land during heavy rainfall.
Conclusion:  The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape and ecological grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 88
ParishEdgefield
Location of siteAdjacent Edgefield Landfill, Holt Road, Edgefield
Submitted byMr G Gent
Proposed use/sAnaerobic digestion
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)1.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information:  The site is elevated agricultural land comprising attractive rolling farmland. It is bounded by a mature hedgerow to the south and adjoins Edgefield Landfill site to the east. A landfill gas powered electricity generating plant, permitted in 2005, lies near the north-east corner of the site. The adjacent landfill has operated for more than 30 years under a series of temporary planning permissions. The current permission is until 2013. 
Landscape: The site lies within the Glaven Valley Conservation Area. The site is reasonably well concealed from close views by hedgerows and the landfill site, although it would be visible from the Stody Estate permissive footpaths which lie close to the proposed area. It would also be visible in a longer view from Lowes Farm and from Hunworth Road. A group of dwellings which includes Edgefield Hall lies approximately 350m to the north. Notwithstanding the presence of the landfill site, which represents a temporary intrusion, the proposed site lies within an attractive and relatively tranquil area of countryside as acknowledged through its Conservation Area designation. The proposed use as an anaerobic digestion unit would introduce new built development into the countryside of a semi-industrial and permanent nature, and unrelated to the nearly finished landfill site. A new access would be required and although this may utilize the landfill access, vehicles accessing the area could also be visible on the skyline. The site is not suitable in landscape terms.
Ecology: The wider surroundings of the site include Holt Lowes SSSI 1.2 km to the north, and Edgefield Woods County Wildlife Site 600m to the north. There is little information to enable an ecological assessment to be made, but the site could be potentially a preferred option in ecology terms with additional information or modification.
Highways: Access should be provided through the landfill site WAS16 to the east, off the west side of the B1149, a Main Distributor Route. Continued use of this access would be acceptable for the development proposed.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on landscape grounds. 

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Comments (2) View Map WAS 29 - SITE WITHDRAWN
ParishNorth Walsham
Location of siteLand Off Field Lane, North Walsham
Submitted byCarl Bird Ltd
Proposed use/sInert landfill
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)0.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is a small narrow valley feature formed as a result of previous inert waste infilling which has raised the level of land adjoining to the north. The “valley? contains an agricultural access track leading from Field Lane.
Landscape:eThe site lies within a wider area of gently undulating, attractive and quite well wooded landscape. It is not open to views from public viewpoints or from residential property, although trees on the site are visible from Field Lane. 
Ecology: There are no special ecological considerations concerning the site.
Highways: Access to the site is via a track off the U10365 Field Lane, a narrow single track road which passes two dwellings close to its junction with the C557 Yarmouth Road (an HGV access route). Field Lane is unsuitable for HGV traffic by virtue of its inadequate width. Its junction with Yarmouth Road is poorly aligned, with extremely poor visibility in both directions. 
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: The site is situated in a small-scale, [natural] valley feature developed in extensive category Pleistocene sediments of the Happisburgh or Lowestoft Formations. It is likely to lead to destruction of a finite local landform. Impact on assets significant at district or local levels.
Environment Agency: Site is adjacent to a closed landfill site, recommend further investigation is carried out into potential gassing. Question whether this is a sustainable location for a waste site. This site overlays a major aquifer; inert landfill only is acceptable.
North Norfolk District Council: The site is set in attractive countryside and the District Council are concerned about any adverse landscape impact and disturbance. This site is close to a gas pipe buffer zone and NNDC would lodge an objection unless it can be demonstrated that there is no adverse impact / risk. The British Pipeline Agency (BPA), National Grid and operators at Bacton Gas terminal (such as Interconnector UK) should be consulted for a view. The site is close to the built up area of North Walsham and there may be concerns about impact on residential amenity.
Parish/public concerns: No comments submitted.
Conclusion:  The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for highways reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (9) View Map WAS 30
ParishNorth Walsham
Location of siteDrury’s Transport Ltd, Folgate Road, Lyngate Industrial Estate, North Walsham
Submitted bySingh (UK) Ltd
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)1.9
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Compost 25,000; other 50,000 (total including existing site).
Background Information: The majority of the site lies within an industrial estate, and has planning permission for and operates as a waste transfer station and recycling facility. The proposal would extend the site further to the north and west, including into an area of woodland.
Landscape: The site is bounded by open countryside and Lyngate Road, a ‘quiet lane’ to the north. There are no outstanding landscape issues, but whilst the woodland on the site is of low quality, it has potential for improvement. Subject to its retention, the site could be supported in landscape terms.
Ecology:  There are no special ecological considerations concerning the site. Hedges on the site boundary should be surveyed for protected species.
Highways: Access to the site is through the industrial estate, via the U14480 Folgate Road, from the B1145 North Walsham Bypass which is within 200m of the site. The site is well-related to the strategic highway network, and subject to use of the existing access no significant highway issues arise.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Note that site is above a major aquifer.
National Grid: The site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines. 
North Norfolk District Council: The site is set on rising land in the countryside and NNDC are concerned about any adverse landscape impact. Concern about possible pollution and run-off to the North Walsham and Dilham canal, designated as a County Wildlife Site. The 'poor quality woodland' referred to in the landscape and ecology summary is actually covered by a Tree Preservation Order, and should be protected. The site is close to the built-up area of North Walsham and there are concerns about impact on residential amenity. This has led to complaints regarding dust and smoke. Expansion of this site would need to address the concerns of neighbouring properties and businesses. The site is close to a gas pipe buffer zone and NNDC would lodge an objection unless it can be demonstrated that there is no adverse impact / risk. The British Pipeline Agency (BPA), National Grid and operators at Bacton Gas terminal (such as Interconnector UK) should be consulted for a view. 
Parish/public concerns: Site is in full view of Lyngate and Bradfield Roads. Hedging is inadequate especially in winter. A stream runs through the development which joins the river Ant and the Broads, already adversely affected by pollution from the industrial area. There is potential for this to increase as the site expands with further developments including composting and other activities. Lyngate road, the narrow quiet lane adjacent to the site cannot cope with more traffic. Adjacent to an area lived in by large numbers of older people who use the area recreationally, making use of the quiet lane and who are already adversely affected by the noise and light pollution. Nuisance from Increased vermin and pollution, plastic litter, burning of waste, noise from crushing; light pollution, and odour.
Conclusion:  Subject to the exclusion of the area of woodland, the site is potentially acceptable for the categories of waste development proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 13
ParishWorstead
Location of siteBoundary Pit, off Sandy Hills Lane, Worstead
Submitted byCarl Bird Ltd
Proposed use/sBiomass Power Plant
cceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)2.3
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information:  The site is that of a permitted and active inert waste recycling operation, to the rear of Carlton Farm. The site is in the countryside, and historically had been a small sand pit. The A149 passes along the south-west west boundary, but access to the permitted operations is eastward only, to Sandy Hills Road.
Landscape: In landscape terms, a development as proposed could be accepted on this site, provided that the height of buildings and associated equipment are similar to those existing, and are thereby screened from external views. 
Ecology:  There are no overriding ecological constraints.
Highways: Potential access to the site is limited by the fact that the A149 is a “Corridor of Movement?, to which no new direct access could be permitted.PThe remaining highway network around the site is not suitable to cater for additional traffic.
External Consultee Comments:
National Grid:  The site is located in the vicinity of National Grid's high pressure gas transmission pipelines.
Environment Agency: Note that the site lies above a major aquifer.
North Norfolk District Council: Note that the site is set on rising land in the countryside and are concerned about adverse landscape impact. This site is close to a gas pipe buffer zone and NNDC would lodge an objection unless it can be demonstrated that there is no adverse impact / risk. The British Pipeline Agency (BPA) and operators at Bacton Gas terminal (such as Interconnector UK) should be consulted for a view.
Parish/public concerns: The proposal to burn plastics (and wood) is ill-thought out. Plastics use should be reduced, and re-use practised wherever possible. Incineration is a potentially dangerous and expensive option.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on highway grounds.

View Comments (1) 7.8 South Norfolk Waste Allocation Sites

Site Reference No. View Comments (11) View Map WAS 35
ParishAldeby and Burgh St Peter
Location of siteAldeby Landfill Site, Oaklands Gravel Pit
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables (materials recycling facility), inert waste recycling, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sComposting
Size of site (hectares)27.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Composting 40,000
Background Information: The site, in the parishes of Aldeby and Burgh St Peter, is an active landfill in a former sand and gravel working. Parts of the site are now restored, and landfill gas powered electricity generation plant is in operation. Former, separate, sand and gravel workings, now restored, lie to the east and west. A haul road links the sites to Rectory Road, Aldeby.
Landscape: The site lies within an attractive area of undulating countryside on rising land forming a small spur above the valley of the River Waveney. The site is adjacent to the Broads, a nationally important landscape. The area has been disturbed over many years by both mineral extraction and waste activities, and detracts from the rural appearance of the landscape. The site is not suitable for permanent facilities. In landscape terms, only composting could be acceptable, for the life of the landfill site only.
Ecology: The edge of the Broads is within 10m, and the River Waveney and Barnby Broad SSSI are within 750m. The site is not considered suitable in ecological terms.
Highways: Highway access is via a private haul route to the C388 Rectory Road (1.6km distant) which is designated as an HGV access route. The C388 joins the A143. Any proposal to intensify the use of the site will require a right turn lane to be provided at the A143/C388 junction.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Site is above a major aquifer.
South Norfolk Council: Proximity to and potential for adverse impact (transport pollution etc) upon, the unique and sensitive environment/landscape that makes the Broads such an attractive area to live, work and visit. 
Broads Authority:  This is currently an operational site which generates some noise and disturbance. Water quality should be protected.
Parish/public concerns: Aldeby is located on the edge of the Broads National Park, not the place to put an industrial complex. The site is at the south-eastern corner of rural Norfolk, is remote from where the waste is generated and is not suitable for a transfer station. Waste will have to be transported over long distances, and be damaging through CO2 emissions. The proximity rule needs to be adhered to. Highways inadequate for more and increasingly large HGVs. Although a dedicated haul road exists, the site can only be reached via the C388 leading to Aldeby and two other adjoining villages. This road and others within the village are not suitable for the increasing size and weight of HGVs. The proposed operations would considerably increase the existing local intrusion caused by noise, dust, litter and odour suffered for many years. Visual intrusion will cease following closure of the landfill operation and completion of restoration; this must not be delayed by the proposed facilities. After more than 20years of landfill and with 2012 getting ever closer for completion date, the village has been inconvenienced enough. There should be no further permissions that extend this date. Locals have had enough and are expecting restoration of this site.
Conclusion: The site is suitable only for composting on a temporary basis.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 26
ParishBergh Apton
Location of siteHousehold Waste Recycling Centre, Welbeck Road
Submitted byNorfolk County Council
Proposed use/sHousehold waste recycling centre
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)0.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: This small site, of 0.11ha, is an existing Household Waste Recycling Centre (HWRC), adjacent to an old landfill site, now restored. The HWRC has been operating under temporary planning permissions, the latest ending in 2012.
Landscape: The site is small and well screened, and has currently has little landscape impact, apart from that of the traffic generated. Subject to roads not needing upgrading works, there is no landscape objection.
Ecology: No particular ecological issues arise.
Highways: The site is accessed from the C373 Welbeck Road, and the nearest Principal Route, the A146 Norwich Road, is 2.5km away via the C373 to Brooke. The site is acceptable in highway terms, although Highway Authority advice is that allocation of HWRC sites should be considered in the context of the wider need for and spatial distribution of sites in relation to population centres.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Site is adjacent to a closed landfill site, which accepted waste in the form of industrial, commercial and household. Gas monitoring points in situ. Above a Major Aquifer.
South Norfolk Council: Proximity to Tree Preservation Order. Note problem with the volume of traffic. Potential impact upon site of archaeological interest. Question regarding the availability of land. 
Parish/public concerns: Site and skips visible from Welbeck Road; blot on the landscape bordering a conservation site; site not screened; spoils the river valley and land administered by the Bergh Apton Conservation Trust; an eyesore which cannot be landscaped; served by narrow country lanes, which are not capable of two-way traffic flow; damage to road banks and verges from traffic; Welbeck Road has a number of blind bends and is unsuitable as access to a busy recycling centre; noise, visual and odour impact; night environment along Welbeck Road impacted by floodlights; litter and fly-tipping; conflict with countryside users such as walkers, cyclists and horse riders; should be in a more accessible location.
Conclusion: The site is small and located in a rural area served by minor roads. Rather than being considered as an allocation, the continued operation of the HWRC would more appropriately be judged in the context of the detail submitted with a planning application, including consideration of the need for such a site in that location. The site should not be considered further as a preferred site. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 62
ParishBracon Ash
Location of sitePart of Hethel Airfield
Submitted byMr S J Stearn
Proposed use/sAnaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer, pyrolysis and gasification
Acceptable use/sInert waste recycling
Size of site (hectares)3.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Inert waste recycling 10,000
Background Information: The site is part of an arable field on part of the former Hethel airfield, 2.5km east of Wymondham. Permission was granted in 2008 for open windrow and “Ecopod? composting of green waste.wThe site has been extended eastward from the original area submitted.
Landscape: The landscape around the site is gently rolling arable farmland, with some large blocks of woodland. To the north is Stanfield Hall (listed Grade II*); to the east is the Hethel Engineering Centre, and to the north-east is the Lotus motor works. Notwithstanding employment uses in the locality, the area is rural in character, containing a scatter of swellings, the nearest being within 350m. Anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer, pyrolysis and gasification would require substantial buildings or other structures. These would be difficult to accommodate in the landscape and would not be appropriate in this location. Such activities and associated traffic are also likely to result unacceptable impacts on local and residential amenity.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest. 
Highways: The site is located off the C186 Wymondham Road, which is an HGV Access Route. Subject to a safe access being formed onto Wymondham Road, the site would be likely to be acceptable to the County Highway Authority. 
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: The setting of the Grade II* listed Stanfield Hall to the north of this proposed waste site allocation could be detrimentally affected, particularly as it is not clear on the exact levels of existing and proposed screening. Further research and analysis is needed to assess the impact of this site allocation.
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is above a Major Aquifer, and also question whether this is a sustainable location. The Agency would require further information on pyrolysis and gasification.
Highways Agency: Advise that further assessment should be undertaken in relation to the potential impact on the A11(T) junction, west of the site, particularly in relation to a proposal for a Household Waste Recycling Centre.
South Norfolk Council: Potential impact upon site of archaeological interest.
Parish/public concerns: Traffic impact, detriment to landscape and wildlife. 
Conclusion: the site should be considered further as a preferred site only for inert waste recycling on landscape and amenity grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 31
ParishCostessey
Location of siteCostessey Transfer Station, Longwater Business Park
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group
Proposed use/sEnergy from waste plant
Acceptable use/sAs above, and other forms of residual waste treatment.
Size of site (hectares)2.6
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.150,000
Background Information: The site is an existing waste transfer station on the Longwater Industrial Estate, Costessey, off the north side of the A47(T) west of Norwich. The site contains a large industrial building and external storage and vehicle circulation areas.
Landscape: The site is at the top of the slope of the south side of the valley of the River Tud. Costessey Park golf course lies within the valley, in the remnants of the parkland of Costessey Hall. Residential development in Costessey occupies the higher land beyond the Tud on the north side of the valley. At a local level the landscape is degraded by existing development on the site, and by neighbouring development. Parts of the industrial area are visible from the north across the Tud Valley, although views are partially screened by woodland. Increase in built development on the site would have the potential to have significant visual impacts on the valley, particularly if tall structures including chimneys were to be introduced. 
Ecology: The site lies within 1km of the River Wensum SAC and SSSI. County Wildlife Site CWS 247 Long Dale to the north lies within 300m of the site. Further County Wildlife Sites, and an Ancient Woodland, lie on the north side of the Tud. There would be an objection on ecological grounds associated with airborne emissions and the potential for deposition. These would need to be assessed.
Highways: The site is well located in relation to the strategic road network, being approximately 500m from the Longwater interchange on the A47(T) with the A1074 Dereham Road Principal Route. An improvement scheme for that junction is programmed. Contributions to the improvement of the interchange would be required in accordance with the Longwater Interchange Policy.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency objects pending information concerning emissions to air and consequent impacts on nearby residential areas and adjacent habitats. The EA note that the site is above a major aquifer.
Highways Agency: Site WAS31 would have the most significant impact on the A47 junction with the A1074 Road, and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day.
South Norfolk Council: Impact on Wensum Special Area of Conservation, SSSI, County Wildlife Site. Development potentially within Strategic Gap. 
Parish/public concerns: objection to incineration of waste for energy; strong preference for Mechanical Biological Treatment; health implications; environmental and ecological impact; fine particle emissions; fly ash disposal; technology should be specified; no need; increased traffic, especially from two sites; no space at the site.
Conclusion: Subject to information to address the Environment Agency objection and ecological issues, the site is potentially acceptable for energy from waste and other forms of residual waste treatment.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 58
ParishCostessey
Location of siteLongwater Employment Area
Submitted byLongwater Gravel Co Ltd
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, inert waste recycling
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)5.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site is a former sand and gravel quarry on the northern margin of the Longwater Industrial Estate. Industrial development, including a waste transfer operation, lies to the south.
Landscape: The site is on employment land above the south side of the valley of the River Tud, and some of the development is visible from the north across the valley. Costessey Park golf course lies within the valley, in the remnants of the parkland of Costessey Hall. Residential development lies on the higher land on the north side of the valley. Woodland to the north, part of Longdell Hills, is an important landscape feature along the edge of the valley. The site could be suitable in landscape terms for the uses proposed, provided that a sufficient buffer is retained to the north to protect and enhance the woodland screen, and that no structures protrude above it.
Ecology: County Wildlife Site CWS 247 Long Dale lies adjacent to the north. The site lies within 1km of the River Wensum SAC and SSSI. Further County Wildlife Sites, and an Ancient Woodland, lie on the north side of the Tud. The site could be potentially a preferred option in ecology terms with additional information or modification.
Highways: The site is well located in relation to the strategic road network, being approximately 500m from the Longwater interchange on the A47(T) with the A1074 Dereham Road Principal Route. An improvement scheme for that junction is programmed. Contributions to the improvement of the interchange would be required in accordance with the Longwater Interchange Policy.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: The Environment Agency note that the site is above a major aquifer. They require further information on the inert waste recycling processing proposed.
Highways Agency: Site WAS 58 would have a significant impact on the A47 junction with the A1074, and have an estimated 100 HGV movements and 20 car movements per day.
South Norfolk Council: Note potential impact on Wensum Special Area of Conservation, SSSI, County Wildlife Site. Development is potentially within Strategic Gap. Question over lack of access rights and restrictive covenant issues. Question need for two plants in Costessey, and transport implications.
Parish/public concerns: Need to carefully assess effects on wildlife including protected species and biodiversity of the river and the valley. Recycling of domestic and trade waste should not be permitted on this site and even inert waste has the potential to damage the delicate balance of this section of the river valley and therefore that too should be refused, but the site might be appropriate for a Resource Recovery Park. The wider area is adequately served for the foreseeable future by facilities that exist and are shortly to be built in Costessey. Further provision in Costessey would therefore be detrimental to the environment as waste would have to be brought from further afield to keep all the facilities viable. 
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site for the uses proposed.

Site Reference No. View Comments (8) View Map WAS 82
ParishCostessey
Location of siteCostessey landfill site
Submitted byEnvironment and Waste Group, Norfolk County Council
Proposed use/sProcessing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, thermal treatment/energy from waste, household waste recycling centre, pyrolysis/gasification
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)16.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site comprises a former landfill site which has been largely restored to a mix of grassland and woodland. It also accommodates a landfill gas to electricity generating plant. The site adjoins a MRF on the Longwater industrial area to the west and is bounded to the south by TPO woodland alongside the A1074. New residential development lies on the south side of the A1074. 
Landscape: The site is on the south side of the Tud valley within land allocated as ‘strategic gap’ (ENV2) and ‘Norwich southern bypass landscape protection zone’ (ENV6) in South Norfolk DC local plan. The developments proposed would be accompanied by a number of permanent structures of varying heights and dimensions depending on uses. These could impact on the appearance of this elevated site as seen from the north side of the Tud Valley. Whilst adjacent to industrial land, the site is prominent, particularly when viewed from the golf course. No information has been given on the proposed location of facilities and whilst there may be possibility to locate certain facilities on the western edge of the site, more information would be required to show how these would not intrude onto the skyline.
Ecology: The site is of no ecological significance. Ecological issues associated with airborne emissions and the potential for deposition would need to be assessed.
Highways: The site is well located in relation to the strategic road network. It is 300m from the U71506 Ernest Gage Avenue, which has no designation in Norfolk’s route hierarchy. It is approx 600m from the site to the junction with the A47 Trunk Road and the A1074 Dereham Road Principal Route. An improvement scheme for that junction is programmed. Contributions to the improvement of the interchange would be required in accordance with the Longwater Interchange Policy.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (6) View Map WAS 27 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 7)
ParishEarsham
Location of siteLand off A134, Park Farm
Submitted byEarsham Gravels Limited
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, inert landfill
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)18.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.Recycling 25,000; landfill 60,000
Background Information: The site comprises arable land on a terrace of the River Waveney, the flat valley floor of which is within 100m of the south-eastern margins of the site. Existing sand and gravel workings lie to the north-east, east of Pheasants Walk. The site has also been proposed for mineral extraction (MIN7). The site has been reduced in area by removal of the land south of the access to Park Farm, and of the area to the north, west of Park Farm Cottages.
Landscape: The site comprises attractive farmland, lying between the more steeply sloping northern side of the Waveney valley and the valley floor. It is bounded by the A143 to the south, an active mineral site to the north east and further farmland to the west. The valley side to the north west comprises a mix of arable and woodland and is settled with isolated large farms. The site lies within the Norfolk and Suffolk Claylands national character area, and within the Waveney Rural River Valley character area within the South Norfolk landscape character assessment (2001). After mineral extraction, inert waste input would be acceptable in landscape terms, and could be beneficial in restoration. 
Ecology: The development would not affect any areas designated as of particular ecological significance. Surveys would be required for barn owls and bats. CWS 122 Buckhills Plantation lies 250m to the south-west. The proposed restoration would bring ecological benefits.
Highways: The site is located west of the U76063 Pheasants Walk, which has no designation the Route Hierarchy. Pheasants Walk and its junction with the A143 would need upgrading for it to be suitable for HGV traffic (also for the proposed mineral site MIN7).
External Consultee Comments:
Norfolk Wildlife Trust: Note potential for restoration to act as a buffer to the River Waveney and for restoration of river terrace habitats.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site is also in proposed site MIN7 which would be developed in the last remaining major fragment in Norfolk of Pleistocene outwash terrace no. 3 (the Homersfield Terrace of Anglian age) of the Waveney valley, with its associated geological and archaeological archives. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. Likely to lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county level.
Environment Agency: Site is above a major aquifer. Subject to a limit to inert landfill, the Agency would be satisfied. Note that site is adjacent to Flood Zone 3, and that a Flood Risk Assessment will be required.
Broads Authority:  The site is considered to be at a sufficient distance not to impact directly on the landscape fabric or landscape amenity of the Broads Executive area. The proposed site however does lie adjacent to a highway which is one of the main "gateways" into the Broads. As such the interface between the highway and the site would have to be carefully designed so as not to detract from this attractive landscape. It is noticeable throughout the Waveney valley the impacts of noise generated by plant working on existing extraction sites. This is mainly from reversing bleeps of vehicles.
South Norfolk Council: Note impact upon river valley landscape and on site of archaeological and geological interest. In terms of geology this site is part of a regionally important landform, viz. a glacial outwash terrace relating to the melting of a Quaternary ice sheet in the Waveney Valley. It forms the last intact section of the Homersfield Terrace (the Suffolk portion being largely destroyed by quarrying) and it is important that it is conserved in order to retain the evidence for reconstructing the past glacial history of the region. The site has been identified as important by the Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership.
Parish/public concerns: If the site is developed an increase in HGV traffic through the Parish of Needham (along A143) can be expected. A thorough safety audit and consideration of safety improvements will be important, especially in the vicinity of Needham roundabout where casualties have previously occurred and where a formalised school cycle route to Harleston may be implemented. Additional HGV traffic may approach the site through the already congested Bungay Town centre. Proposals likely to be highly detrimental to the Waveney Valley landscape.
Conclusion: Should the site be acceptable for mineral extraction, it should be considered further as a preferred site for the waste developments proposed, on a temporary basis. 

Site Reference No. View Comments (10) View Map WAS 85
ParishEaston
Location of siteLongdell Hills sand and gravel quarry
Submitted byEaston Estate
Proposed use/sInert landfill
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)10.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site lies north of the A47 within an area of woodland and parkland on plateau land south of the valley of the River Tud. It adjoins the Longwater industrial area to the east and would be accessed through the existing mineral site. Residential development lies on the south side of the A47, in the village of Easton.
Landscape: The site is an active mineral working, formerly fields enclosed within a woodland belt. The site currently has consent for low level restoration, although some inert waste imports are permitted. Increasing the quantity to restore original contours would have a low impact on the surrounding landscape provided that:
  1. the surrounding woodland is protected from the operations;
  2. the ultimate land-use was of similar or greater value to the prevailing landscape character of the area as the permitted scheme; and
  3. the approved timescale was acceptable and did not cause excessive delay in the restoration of the site
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest, and would not affect any designated areas of wildlife significance.
Highways: Access is proposed via existing CEMEX processing plant to the east, and onto the U71340 Alex Moorhouse Way, which has no specific designation in the County Council’s Route Hierarchy. It is less than 1km to the A1074 / A47 Longwater Interchange. A financial contribution would be required under the Longwater Interchange Contributions Policy.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken.
Conclusion: the site is potentially acceptable for infilling with inert waste, subject to satisfying landscape criteria.

Withdrawn
Site Reference No. View Map WAS 28 (also submitted as mineral site MIN 25) - SITE WITHDRAWN
ParishHaddiscoe
Location of siteLand off B1136 Loddon Road, Manor Farm
Submitted byEarsham Gravels Ltd
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, inert landfill
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)25.1
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is adjacent to the village of Haddiscoe and most of it lies to the north of the B1136 close to the junction with the A143. The site has also been proposed as a site for mineral extraction (sand and gravel); MIN25.
Landscape: The site is within an area of open arable landscape to the south-west of expansive areas of marshland on the floor of the Yare Valley, which is within the Broads Authority area. Parts of the site are open to view including from the B1136 to the south, from nearby properties and public rights of way. Use of the site for landfill and recycling would have an adverse impact on views, residential amenity and the quiet enjoyment of the countryside. The setting of the village church would also be adversely affected.
Ecology: There are no special ecological considerations concerning the site itself, although the site is adjacent to the Broads. Surveys of the site would be needed to identify BAP species. There would be potential for restoration to improve biodiversity.
Highways: The site is well located on the strategic highway network, but access onto the A143 would be difficult for traffic turning right from the B1136. 
External Consultee Comments:
English Heritage: Have significant concerns regarding the proximity of the Grade I listed St. Mary’s Church to the south of the proposed site allocation. The setting of this church, particularly to the west, is of open countryside and the church itself occupies a prominent position. The setting of another Grade I listed church to the north (St Matthias in Thorpe) could also be detrimentally affected. We have already raised concerns about the impact of mineral extraction in this location as part of MIN 25 and similar issues remain for waste activities. The restoration of the landscape as part of the inert landfill would need to be very sensitively handled to avoid permanent damage to the setting of the listed churches.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: This site is within proposed site MIN25 which would be developed in extensive resource sediments of the Pliocene Norwich Crag and the Pleistocene Happisburgh and Anglian Formations, as studied at nearby Haddiscoe Old Pit. The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. May lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
Environment Agency: Above a Major Aquifer. Subject to limit to inert landfill the Environment Agency would be satisfied. Question whether this is a sustainable location for a waste site.
Broads Authority: The site lies in close proximity to Haddiscoe village upon which the proposed workings would have a significant landscape impact. The proposed site lies adjacent to the Broads boundary however, with a careful design of earthworks (not simply a bund arrangement) and with some additional planting the north east boundary could be effectively screened from the BA exec area. However this cannot be said of the longer distance views into the site from the Broads area. This would be of extreme concern to the Authority. Also there would be a significant impact on the setting of the local church. Potentially the waste operations require additional fencing which could cause impacts in their own right. The noise and activity associated with the waste transfer may have considerable impacts on this area. Gulls can add to this loss of tranquillity. Water quality should be protected.
South Norfolk Council: This site is too close to the centre of the village and the noise and dust generated will have an unacceptable impact on the amenity of the local residents, some of whose properties back directly onto the site. Potential for adverse impact (transportation pollution etc) upon, residential properties and village centre as well as the unique and sensitive environment/landscape that makes The Broads such an attractive area to live, work and visit. Potential impact upon site(s) of archaeological interest. Too close to the centre of the village and the noise and dust will have an unacceptable impact on the amenity local residents, some of whose properties back directly onto this site. The junction of the B1136 and A143 is dangerous already before adding additional traffic movements. Traffic dangers over a wider area noted.
Parish/public concerns: Smell, loss of wildlife, noise from the processing plant, vehicular movement; increased volume of traffic on existing, inadequate, overloaded and dangerous roads, including past the First School; dust and light pollution; loss of agricultural land and food production; restoration no environmental benefit; impact on bridleway; drainage; too close to the church; health implications of dust; water pollution; impact on the Broads.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site for either of the developments proposed, for landscape, highways and amenity reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (5) View Map WAS 2
ParishKimberley
Location of siteWarren Hill, Wymondham Road
Submitted byMr G Mann
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer.
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)6.7
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: A former mineral working in the countryside between Kimberley and Wicklewood. 
Landscape: The most serious impact would be on Attleborough Lodge. Any development or mitigation measure on the western side of the site would have a detrimental visual impact on that dwelling. On the eastern side of the site, the visual impact is on the long-range views from some of the properties in Wicklewood. They would be less affected by activities on the lower-lying southern part of the eastern section of the site. Waste disposal might be possible on the area of the existing composting operation and the southern part of the eastern and (where existing woodland permits) central sections of the site.
Ecology: A permanent waste site would lose the meadow habitat and cause disturbance to woodlands. Land adjoins County Wildlife Sites 151 and 152. Not suitable in ecological terms.
Highways: The site is located on the B1135 Crownthorpe Road which is a Main Distributor in the Route Hierarchy, and could be accepted provided a safe and adequate access can be formed onto the B1135. Consideration will also need to be given to the suitability of this site for a HWRC given its distance from a major population centre and the nature of the B1135 linking the site to Wymondham.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Above a major aquifer. Question whether this is a sustainable location for a waste site.
English Heritage: The scheduled and listed remains of Kimberley Hall are a short distance to the north, partially screened by existing woodland. EH have significant concerns regarding the impact of this proposed site allocation on the setting of the adjoining Grade II* registered historic park & garden (Kimberley Hall). This park and garden is of exceptional historic interest and the development of facilities for waste processing and recycling could have a detrimental impact on the setting of the park, including views in and out. It is not clear whether the existing pits would be in-filled, but any alterations will have an impact on the historic landscape. There is also a Grade II listed lodge immediately to the north-west of the site allocation and a Grade II* listed church to the south-east (St James' in Crownthorpe), both of which could be affected. Further research and analysis is needed to assess the impacts on this proposed site allocation on the above features.
South Norfolk District Council: Local road network is dangerous and unsuitable for type and increase in traffic. Some disagreement over route lorries should take. Potential impact on site(s) of archaeological significance, historic parkland and county wildlife sites. Pollution and smell from the existing site is unacceptable. Noise from transport and site operations.
Parish/public concerns: Landscape intrusion, noise, dust, roads inadequate, danger from traffic, water pollution, ecological impact, impact on tourism (Mid Norfolk Railway nearby), wrong location, health risk.
Conclusion: Any development on the site would be severely constrained by the proximity of a dwelling (Attleborough Lodge, which is a listed building), and by ecological considerations within the site and in relation to adjacent County Wildlife Sites. This rural site is distant from a centre of population and is not well located for any waste development. It should not be considered further as a preferred site.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 8
ParishKirby Bedon
Location of siteOaklands, Loddon Road, Framingham Pigot
Submitted byMr G Walker
Proposed use/sComposting, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, waste transfer
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)2.2
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is adjacent to the A146 Loddon Road, opposite The Feathers public house, at the junction with Fox Road. Site has no minerals or waste planning history. Public right of way Framingham Pigot FP1 passes along the southern boundary.
Landscape: Site is screened from view by thick hedges. Lies within a wider area of gently undulating farmland. Intensification of uses on the site could require highway improvements and removal of the screen hedge.
Ecology: The site is not of any special ecological interest. A County Wildlife Site (CWS 263 – Furze Close) lies 150m to the west.
Highways: Access would be directly off the north-east side of the A146, which is a Corridor of Movement onto which intensification of traffic is resisted. The need for improvements at the junction has been recognised, but no scheme has been designed or is in the 5-year capital programme. Any intensification of uses of the site would necessitate the provision of a right-turn lane off the A146, and that would need to be incorporated as part of a scheme for improvements of the Fox Lane junction. 
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Site above a major aquifer, and a Groundwater Source Protection Zone. Question whether this is a sustainable location for a waste site.
South Norfolk Council: Query potential impact upon County Wildlife Sites, and on sites of archaeological interest.
Parish/public concerns: Kirby Bedon PC is concerned that a waste site would compete with the existing facility at Bergh Apton, which would then be vulnerable to closure. Bergh Apton is in a better strategic location than Kirby Bedon to serve a larger population within South Norfolk. The site overlies a soil type known as Beccles Series which is clay with a sand fraction. It is notorious as being poorly drained. Framingham Pigot PC are concerned at potential danger having road access opposite Fox Road and Feathers, and at extra traffic through a village which has weight restriction. Site totally unsuited to any activity that increases traffic flow, especially for household waste. Other concerns: impact of odour and noise on nearby businesses; undulating land will need bunding to ensure no pollution, and current state and management of site and major rodent infestation.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site, on highways grounds.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 72 (also submitted as mineral site MIN56)
ParishLong Stratton and Morningthorpe
Location of siteLand to north of B1527, Mill Farm
Submitted byBrett Aggregates (Eastern) Limited
Proposed use/sInert landfill
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)11.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: The site is an area of attractive gently undulating arable landscape on the shoulder of the valley of a tributary of the River Tas. The site lies between the floodplain to the north, and the B1527 Bungay Road to the south. 
Landscape: The site is also proposed as a mineral allocation, and infilling with waste would be dependent on prior mineral extraction. The assessment for mineral extraction is as follows: “The site lies within an area of relative tranquillity as defined by the CPRE and in an area of dark landscape on the county map. The site is remote from settlement although one property lies down in the valley and adjoins the northern boundary of the proposed area. It is open to view from the Bungay Road and although this could be screened by an earth bund, this in itself could be intrusive in the landscape?.lThe site is open to views from the Bungay Road and parts can be seen from a public footpath, Long Stratton FP2, which divides the site. Restoration to Biodiversity Action Plan mixed deciduous woodland could be a landscape benefit.
Ecology: Restoration to woodland would also create a large block of habitat that would complement the areas of open wet meadow to the north. The site would need to be surveyed for signs of European Protected Species.
Highways: The site is located on the B1527 Bungay Road which is a Main Distributor in the Route Hierarchy. Access is intended to be via a new haul route east of the site which would reach the B1527 at the existing access serving the Brett Aggregates Ltd Morningthorpe site. Most loads leaving would travel west to the A140. The development would require a junction improvement at the Hempnall Crossroads (A140 – B1527 junction). However, this is unlikely to be implemented until funding is available to construct a bypass for Long Stratton. A contribution will need to be made to this scheme. If development of this site is likely to increase traffic then it will be resisted until the Long Stratton bypass scheme can be delivered.
Archaeology: This site has been subject to an archaeological evaluation. Mitigation will depend on the results of the evaluation.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, the site was included in the Issues and Options consultation for mineral extraction, as site MIN 56. The consultation responses on MIN 56 are relevant to this site.
Environment Agency:- Objection to MIN 56 on ecological grounds due to the River Tas. Site is adjacent to Flood Zone 3. Potential incursion into functional flood plain.
English Heritage: - The setting of a Grade II listed building immediately to the north of the proposed site is likely to be detrimentally affected by minerals operations here.
Parish/public comments: - Issues were raised regarding the potential impact on the landscape, ecology, highways and amenity from mineral extraction.
Conclusion: the site should not be considered further as a preferred site, for landscape reasons.

Site Reference No. View Comments (72) View Map WAS 71 (also submitted as mineral site MIN54)
ParishMarlingford and Colton
Location of siteLand to the North of Bawburgh Road
Submitted byThe Lombe Estate Trust
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, inert landfill
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)20.5
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.50,000
Background Information: The site is in rolling, mainly arable countryside, elevated above the northern side of the valley of the River Yare. Easton Agricultural College is to the north-east. 
Landscape: The site is dependent on prior mineral extraction (proposed under site ref MIN54). Mineral extraction might be possible if suitable bunding was in place. Noisy operations should be kept well away from the southern section of the site as far as is practicable. Landfilling to original ground level should be acceptable, restoration to a mix of arable, hedgerows and woodland would have the potential to enhance landscape character.
Ecology: The site is of no particular ecological interest. Proposed restoration to arable land with wide field margins, mixed species, hedgerows and woodland would increase biodiversity value.
Highways: The site is located on the C168 Marlingford Road which has no specific designation in the County Council’s route hierarchy. Access would be gained via a haul route running parallel to Marlingford Road to its junction with U78224 Broom Lane. Broom Lane would be widened and improved from the junction with Marlingford Road to Broom Farm, as will the existing track running north from Broom Farm to its junction with Church Lane, Easton, and Church Lane itself. A contribution would be required towards the A47 / A1074 Longwater Interchange Contributions Policy.
External Consultee Comments: As a late submission, external consultations have yet to be undertaken on this proposal. However, the site was also proposed as mineral extraction site MIN 54 and included in the Issues and Options consultation in 2008. The consultation responses on MIN 54 are relevant to this site.
English Heritage: The setting of a Grade II* listed building to the south-west of the proposed site is likely to be detrimentally affected by minerals operations here.
Highways Agency: Traffic would reach the A47 trunk road at the junction with the Dereham Road, Easton and an estimated 120 daily HGV movements. This site would lead to an estimated maximum daily increase of 120 HGVs and approximately two personal injury accidents per year over a 5 year period. Although Site MIN54 is relatively large, NCC state that there is an option proposed in the submission for this site to create a haul road across the Yare Valley to the undesignated C168 Mill Road to the B1108, Watton Road, a main distributor road. If this option is taken forward, it is unlikely that this site would have a significant impact upon the A47/Dereham Road junction at Easton. Without a haul road, there may be a need for an assessment.
Parish / public comments: - Issues were raised regarding the impact on highways, the impact on the Yare valley, landscape and ecology from mineral extraction.
Conclusion: Subject to prior mineral extraction being acceptable the site should be considered further as a preferred site.

Site Reference No. View Comments (3) View Map WAS 7
ParishMorningthorpe
Location of siteSand and Gravel Pit, south of Longacre Plantation
Submitted byRobert Brett and Sons Ltd
Proposed use/sInert waste recycling, landfill
Acceptable use/sNone
Size of site (hectares)4.4
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.N/A
Background Information: An active site, having permission until 18 March 2013 for restoration of former quarry using inert wastes with re-use of recyclable materials, and importation with storage of primary aggregates for resale. 
Landscape: The site lies in a river valley landscape, remote from property and public view, although a public footpath (Morningthorpe FP34) passes the north-west corner of the site. The current temporary permission was granted to facilitate restoration within an acceptable timescale. A permanent use of this rural site for recycling, with additional landfilling beyond that previously justified for restoration, would not be appropriate.
Ecology: There are no natural environment designations on the site. A County Wildlife Site (100 Fritton Grange Meadows) lies 230m to the east, and a tributary of the River Tas passes within 200m to the north. 
Highways: Access to the site would continue to be off the north side of the B1527 Bungay Road, a main Distributor Route, which has a junction with the A140 1.3km to the west (Hempnall Crossroads). A contribution towards junction improvements would be needed should further development be permitted at this site and which would generate additional levels of traffic.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Object on ecological grounds, as it is near the tributary of the Tas. The site overlays a Major Aquifer and is located in Groundwater Source Protection Zone 3. Would be satisfied with a limit to inert landfill.
Norfolk Geodiversity Partnership: Site is in a pit close to a tributary of the River Tas and may include remains of a river terrace. It has yielded researched exposures of Pliocene Norwich Crag and a range of Pleistocene glacial deposits including the Happisburgh and Lowestoft Formations (Starston and Lowestoft Tills). The proposed landfill may remove access to sections for scientific study. Likely to lead to impact on geodiversity assets significant at regional or county levels.
South Norfolk Council: Refer to impact upon river valley landscape.
Parish/public concerns: Parish object to further landfill where gravel has been extracted next to existing landfill site. Would be detrimental to the river valley landscape protected by South Norfolk Council policy ENV3. Other responses refer to pollution of water table and River Tas affecting wildlife; highway danger at the B1527/A140 junction; and safety and amenity implications of HGV increase on the B1527 and in Hempnall village.
Conclusion: The site should not be considered further as a preferred site for landscape and ecological reasons

Site Reference No. View Comments (4) View Map WAS 33
ParishTivetshall St Margaret
Location of sitePulham Market Transfer Station, Station Road
Submitted byWaste Recycling Group
Proposed use/sHousehold waste recycling centre
Acceptable use/sAs above
Size of site (hectares)1.8
Estimated capacity tonnes p.a.HWRC 3,000
Background Information: The site is an existing waste transfer facility, sited immediately west of the A140 and its junction with the B1134 Station Road. The development has permanent planning permission, granted 20 years ago. In 2005 permission was granted for the reception of bulky DIY and garden waste brought by householders.
Landscape: The site is in a rural location, but is well screened by woodland. Subject to this visual screen not being compromised, the proposed use would be acceptable in landscape terms.
Ecology: The site is of no special ecological interest, although supporting detail or mitigation work may be needed.
Highways: The site is accessed from the B1134, a Main Distributor route. The “Pulham Crossroads? junction is within 80m to the east.wA recent improvement scheme was completed in 2009, replacing the crossroads with a roundabout. Subject to consideration of the site in relation to the spatial distribution of HWRCs, it would be appropriate for the use proposed.
External Consultee Comments:
Environment Agency: Note that the site is above a Major Aquifer, and there is potential incursion into a functional flood plain. A Flood Risk Assessment will be required.
South Norfolk Council: Potential impact upon site(s) of archaeological interest.
Parish/public concerns: Support for the expansion of the site as a potential asset to the village. Local concerns on grounds of highway safety had been expressed prior to the completion in 2009 of the roundabout at the B1134/A140 junction. Concern that there would be no increase in heavy vehicles going through Tasburgh. Would be a more convenient domestic waste and recycling facility, avoiding the need for Pulham Market residents to travel to the Morningthorpe site. Rate of recycling will increase over present levels.
Conclusion: The site should be considered further as a preferred site for a Household Waste Recycling Site.

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